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Thread: Miranda Lambert - The Weight Of These Wings

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    Insane Carrie Fan abbeyjones18's Avatar
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    Miranda Lambert - The Weight Of These Wings

    Official Website: https://www.mirandalambert.com/
    Miranda-Lambert-Weight-of-These-Wings-album.jpg
    Album: The Weight Of These Wings
    Label: RCA Nashville/Vanner Records
    Release Date: November 18, 2016
    Official Tracklist:
    https://twitter.com/mirandalambert/s...07981313437696

    Spotify: https://play.spotify.com/album/563h5..._lambert_album

    Disc 1 - THE NERVE:
    1. Runnin' Just In Case (Miranda Lambert/Gwen Sebastian) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GsqzEdzrBWg
    2. Highway Vagabond (Natalie Hemby/Luke Dick/Shane McAnally) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTgYb8vwux8
    3. Ugly Lights (Natalie Hemby/Miranda Lambert/Liz Rose) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYnPIoQsz9w
    4. You Wouldn't Know Me (Shake Russell) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0HB96hkAsGo
    5. We Should Be Friends (Miranda Lambert) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Rhhve-hwYE
    6. Pink Sunglasses (Rodney Clawson/Luke Dick/Natalie Hemby) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_pMQN7GICjE
    7. Getaway Driver (Anderson East/Natalie Hemby/Miranda Lambert) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MiTwT6KDBgM
    8. Vice (Miranda Lambert/Shane McAnally/Josh Osborne) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XxQz2P6X9Fg
    9. Smoking Jacket (Natalie Hemby/Miranda Lambert/Lucie Silvas) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ttUfyZMHNeU
    10. Pushin' Time (Natalie Hemby/Miranda Lambert/Foy Vance) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bqpDt7J-vG0
    11. Covered Wagon (Danny O’Keefe) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3bbaOzaDZ4
    12. Use My Heart (Miranda Lambert/Ashley Monroe/Waylon Payne) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omEs9E4kaKs

    Disc 2 - THE HEART:
    1. Tin Man (Jack Ingram/Miranda Lambert/Jon Randall) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62mEFlE4EPE
    2. Good Ol' Days (Brent Cobb/Adam Hood/Miranda Lambert) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z7K1K3BwBcE
    3. Things That Break (Jessi Alexander/Natalie Hemby/Miranda Lambert) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRfLYA9_j78
    4. For The Birds (Miranda Lambert/Aaron Raitiere) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RNXAY4fzQ4o
    5. Well-Rested (Anderson East/Miranda Lambert/Aaron Ratiere) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxXCV9ap1GQ
    6. Tomboy (Natalie Hemby/Miranda Lambert/Aaron Ratiere) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fWqvpUp8ew
    7. To Learn Her (Miranda Lambert/Ashley Monroe/Waylon Payne) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pKN5njqRZkA
    8. Keeper Of the Flame (Natalie Hemby/Miranda Lambert/Liz Rose) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMY270Otu_s
    9. Bad Boy (Miranda Lambert/Mando Saenz) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mZGZbrn1-o
    10. Six Degrees Of Separation (Nicolle Galyon/ Natalie Hemby/Miranda Lambert) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYrEXFwfvfQ
    11. Dear Old Sun (Terri Jo Box/Miranda Lambert/Gwen Sebastian) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-A6uIEImLVk
    12. I've Got Wheels (Miranda Lambert/Gwen Sebastian/Scotty Wray) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzBbbXvFkyg

    1st Single: "Vice"
    miranda-lambert-vice.jpg
    Release Date: July 18, 2016
    Written By: Miranda Lambert/Shane McAnally/Josh Osborne
    Audio: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XxQz2P6X9Fg
    Music Video:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTlaRu_Wsl4

    2nd Single: "We Should Be Friends"
    CxT92AxUQAAHhfb.jpg large.jpg
    Release Date: December 12, 2016
    Written By: Miranda Lambert
    Audio: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Rhhve-hwYE
    Music Video:

    Metacritic: Reviews for The Weight of These Wings by Miranda Lambert - Metacritic

    Album Reviews:
    Rolling Stone:
    Miranda Lambert's 'Weight of These Wings': Track by Track - Rolling Stone
    Review: Miranda Lambert, 'The Weight of These Wings' - Rolling Stone
    The Ringer:
    https://theringer.com/miranda-lamber...8cc#.fzkz7f3bg
    Star-Telegram:
    With double album, Miranda Lambert soars with masterful ?Wings? | The Star-Telegram
    Exclaim:
    Miranda Lambert The Weight of These Wings
    AP/News OK:
    Miranda Lambert's album highlights duality as singer, writer | News OK
    New York Times:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/17/ar...view.html?_r=0
    NPR:
    On 'The Weight Of These Wings,' Miranda Lambert Improvises A Life : The Record : NPR
    The New Yorker:
    Miranda Lambert?s Power Play - The New Yorker
    Nashville Over Here:
    https://nashvilleoverhere.com/album-...f-these-wings/
    Stereogum:
    Album Of The Week: Miranda Lambert The Weight Of These Wings - Stereogum
    The Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/music/20...-rollercoaster
    USA TODAY: http://www.usatoday.com/story/entert...more/93986850/
    EW: http://www.ew.com/article/2016/11/18...ings-ew-review
    Wide Open Country: http://www.wideopencountry.com/album...f-these-wings/

    *List of Writes/Co-Writes-Album Cuts* - Windmills's Musical Musings ? Updated 07/27/16! Miranda Lambert - Upcoming Album...
    Last edited by abbeyjones18; 12-20-2016 at 02:40 PM.

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    Thank you! Hopefully the title of this one will actually get changed to the new album's title, unlike the Platinum thread, lol.
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    Insane Carrie Fan abbeyjones18's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kizmet311 View Post
    Thank you! Hopefully the title of this one will actually get changed to the new album's title, unlike the Platinum thread, lol.
    LOL! I'll make sure to change it! Might need to be reminded, though.

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    Insane Carrie Fan Farawayhills's Avatar
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    "Keeper of the Flame" is the title of her current tour, and of a (so far unheard) song that seems likely to be on the album - so it could also be the album title (however, this tour, which began well before a new album comes out, may be too early to be considered closely connected with the next era - though they are likely to overlap)
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    Carrie Guru thaifood's Avatar
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    The album is sure to conatin at least two or three singles that will stall out in the mid teens hence.....mega success on the Lambert scale.
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    Quote Originally Posted by thaifood View Post
    The album is sure to conatin at least two or three singles that will stall out in the mid teens hence.....mega success on the Lambert scale.
    I don't need every artist I like to be mega-successful. And I can still thoroughly enjoy Miranda's music despite the over-awarding. I get that people are upset that she is dominating award shows when her sales and radio success don't line up, but I personally still love her music.
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    Quote Originally Posted by thaifood View Post
    The album is sure to conatin at least two or three singles that will stall out in the mid teens hence.....mega success on the Lambert scale.
    I don't hinge my appreciation and admiration of music on sales/radio success. There is far more music out there to love than what radio plays.

    Carrie's success isn't why I love her and her music. She just makes some damn great music. That's it. So does Miranda, Brandy Clark, Kacey Musgraves, Margo Price, etc.
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    Insane Carrie Fan Farawayhills's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thaifood View Post
    The album is sure to conatin at least two or three singles that will stall out in the mid teens hence.....mega success on the Lambert scale.
    A high proportion of the material played on Mainstream radio isn't really to my musical taste - by contrast, some of Miranda's lower charting material includes songs I've enjoyed much more. In general, though, I'm more of an album listener, and I find most artists have better tracks that don't chart at all, and aren't released as singles.

    "Platinum" would be a case in point. The first two singles "Automatic" and "Somethin' bad" were the highest charting cuts - yet they were probably my least favourite tracks on that album.

    It wouldn't surprise me if a similar pattern emerged this time - one or two more commercial early singles, followed by some "labour of love" releases that radio is luke warm about, and some deep album tracks that are not released as singles at all, but are among the most varied and interesting cuts in the collection.

    Her radio success can certainly be described as mixed, at best - and I think there are a number of factors involved in that - a less commercial emphasis in much of her material, a reputation for being a "core Country" artist at a time when radio's preference is towards catering for more mixed audiences, the problem of programmers' reluctance to put several women into high rotation in the same time frame, the seemingly rather haphazard pattern in her label's promotion of her singles.

    I think Miranda is relatively more immune to this patchy radio support than some artists would be - partly because much of her artistic support from critics and fellow musicians also sees her as primarily an album and performance artist, and partly because her fan base contains significant elements who are not focused on Mainstream radio. However, as a Mainstream artist, with a mixed fan base of whom that is only partially true, she and her label can't ignore the radio demand - and I would expect the lead single to be aimed at hoping to show relevance to that sector.

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    Carrie Guru pklongbeach's Avatar
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    I have earnest hope that I will like the new single. I already like the name of the tour. And as I have liked songs of hers in the past, i always have hope.

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    Hopefully she writes solo more for this cd because she is gifted writer. I still really like some of her earlier solo writes that even go back to her first cd. I am so excited for her new music. I wonder if she will do different styles of country this time like Platinum with Holding On To You and All That's Left for example. Keeper Of The Flame sounds like it could be interesting song if it is one, but even if it isn't I like that title for tour.
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    I would like a more striped down sound for her. Just a great melody and a good back beat with a few strong chords and I'm good.
    I actually thought that Platinum was too much of an exercise in different sounds and styles and I did not feel her sincerely locked in to any of it. Some of it bordered on cartoon ish.

    I would like to see some simpler concepts and ideas that are interesting and poinient to today. (I think she tries too hard to sound like an old soul instead of speaking to right now).
    I think she is a good enough songwriter that if she opened her eyes to the reality of what is right now, she could have some interesting perspective. But things like Automatic are, to me, an "automatic" wink to a country-past she does not even know.

    I think if someone like Miranda Lambert put her own spin of the term "contemporary country" it could be really cool.

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    My fav "sound" of Miranda is Virginia Blue Bells or Oklahoma Sky or Dear Diamond, etc. Her voice sounds just right on that style. I think that is the "sweet" spot of her voice.
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    I love the way she sings Holding On To You.

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    I love her voice on House that Built Me and also White Liar and of course my all time favorite FIAST. But I really don't like the angry-Miranda ala Kerocene / Gun Powder... and a lot of it starts to get a little preachy to me. Now I know that sounds ironic when I love some of Carries faith based offerings. But I believe Carrie in her heart when she sings them so I excuse the over-sentimentality. For some reason I am not that convinced when Miranda does the "I understand the down trodden wasp woman" thing. It feels more put on to me. So it just sounds "preachy".

    I am not sure I am making sense. It just continues to feel like she is selling an image much like her "vintage stores" that don't actually feel legitimately authentic. But somehow, when Carrie sells a healthy line of athletic clothes for a contemporary woman who wants to work out hard and still stop by the store before heading home and still look presentable.... I believe it.

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    I can enjoy most of Miranda's stuff.

    What I didn't like were Mama's Broken Heart and Little Red Wagon. It was like she was trying to be the second coming of Gretchen Wilson. What I REALLY didn't like was Automatic. I couldn't believe it won so many awards. Carrie's Smoke Break is 10 million times better than Automatic.

    I'm hopeful, but not holding my breath for the next era for Miranda.

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    Insane Carrie Fan Farawayhills's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lizcarlo View Post
    Hopefully she writes solo more for this cd because she is gifted writer. I still really like some of her earlier solo writes that even go back to her first cd. I am so excited for her new music. I wonder if she will do different styles of country this time like Platinum with Holding On To You and All That's Left for example. Keeper Of The Flame sounds like it could be interesting song if it is one, but even if it isn't I like that title for tour.
    Her early albums were full of solo writes - but they have been few and far between on the recent albums. Where they do occur ("Dear Diamond", "Bathroom Sink"), they are among her most reflective studies, exploring aspects of the feminine psyche, and are often particular fan favourites.

    Windmills has found just one solo write so far, that might be on the album, although her list is provisional and may be incomplete. The new one is called “We Should Be Friends”.
    (Windmills has also found another song, just written by Miranda with Gwen - as they sing so much together on tour, this could probably be considered one by the team - It's called “Runnin’ Just In Case”)

    I certainly expect a mixture of Country styles - several of her co-writers, e.g, Mando Saenz, Brent Cobb, Aaron Raitiere, come from the more Alternative wing, so I expect some of the album to lean "Americana".

    One song at least sounds "traditional" (some may regret her going in that direction - I'll try to address that point in my next post). It was co-written with Adam Hood, an old friend she's earlier sung with. You can hear a rough live cut of him singing it in a rather noisy environment here (Thanks to Kimberly Faye Cook for the video)
    https://www.facebook.com/kimberly.lo...type=2&theater

    However, I'm also expecting some songs to pitch Miranda more to Mainstream relevance. Among the "possibles" there are co-writes with people like Luke Laird and Shane McAnally, who are stalwart supporters of the current female "new wave".

    "Keeper of the Flame" is co-written with Natalie Hemby (probably the most influential of Miranda's recent writing partners) and Liz Rose (current co-holder of the Song of the Year, and co-writer of what I consider one of Carrie's all-time most expressive vocals, "Like I'll Never Love You Again"). These are strong writers, and I'm hoping "Keeper of the Flame" will be one of the standouts

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    Insane Carrie Fan Farawayhills's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pklongbeach View Post
    I love her voice on House that Built Me and also White Liar and of course my all time favorite FIAST. But I really don't like the angry-Miranda ala Kerocene / Gun Powder... and a lot of it starts to get a little preachy to me. Now I know that sounds ironic when I love some of Carries faith based offerings. But I believe Carrie in her heart when she sings them so I excuse the over-sentimentality. For some reason I am not that convinced when Miranda does the "I understand the down trodden wasp woman" thing. It feels more put on to me. So it just sounds "preachy".

    I am not sure I am making sense. It just continues to feel like she is selling an image much like her "vintage stores" that don't actually feel legitimately authentic. But somehow, when Carrie sells a healthy line of athletic clothes for a contemporary woman who wants to work out hard and still stop by the store before heading home and still look presentable.... I believe it.
    I think what we find believable or unbelievable in an artist's song themes and interpretation is heavily coloured by our personal preferences (both stylistic and artist-centred), by the other music we mainly listen to, by the image we've formed of the singer's personality, and by the back-story we've heard about his or her background and beliefs.

    Comparisons between Carrie and Miranda are disliked by many fans, and are often rather circuitous or lead to the "obvious" conclusion that we prefer what we prefer! But as a couple of points that can touch on the artists' role and emphasis in Country Music have been raised, I'll try to address them.

    Both ladies have, in my opinion, always had songs that seem credible and convincing expressions of things that mean a lot to them. Like you. I find Carrie's "faith songs" very convincing as stemming from something that's a big part of who she is. I also find some of her early songs convincing because they include references that it's easy to believe are semi-autobiographical. "Don't Forget To Remember Me" (which she adopted) and "Crazy Dreams" (which she co-wrote) are cases in point. I know that Carrie never experienced the trauma of "Just a Dream" - but I still find the empathy and emotion in the song very believable.

    In Carrie's case, though, there are other songs that she appears to me to have less personal connection with. She sings them very well, and gives a thoroughly entertaining and professional performance - but she seems to have a degree of detachment from many of her songs as a narrator, who "sings" the song more than "lives" the song. (If this was just my opinion, it would be largely irrelevant - but I do think it's quite widely shared by others who see her way that way.) I think it's both helped her to wide appeal and commercial success, since she "presents" stage and recorded songs to audiences in a way that they can find their own reasons to understand and like - but has also tended to harm her with some critics and fellow musicians, who can often see her approach as more distant and less involved. I'd suggest songs like "Last Name", "All American Girl" and "Cowboy Casanova" (which have proven fan favourites and commercial successes) have, nevertheless, contributed to giving Carrie a reputation for being the public face (and, on the female side, the best exponent) of the "Nashville Hit Machine" - loved by radio and the public, but not always wining the same degree of critical support.

    I think Carrie's second and third studio albums (especially the latter) did a lot to entrench that dichotomy, and although I think BA was a much more experimental and adventurous album, it seemed to do relatively little to change the views that had taken hold. That's why I was particularly pleased with "Storyteller". Unlike some fans here, I found the lead single, SB (and its video), perfect for setting the scene - I found it one of Carrie's most empathetic and "involved" performances - and it led into an album that was both experimental, and, in several of the songs, her most personal yet. (Was SB "preachy"? - perhaps - but I'll take a "message" song over a "fun" song almost any time)

    Turning to Miranda - I think the reaction to her general work has often been the mirror image to that described above - less radio and commercial success, more critical and musician approval. And to me, that's often been understandable. No artist hits the button every time - but in her best work, she can lay bare her characters' emotions in ways that make her one of the most "involved" expressive singers in the genre today. To me, examples such as "More Like Her", "Bathroom Sink" and (remarkably) some of her very early songs, are highly believable - and that has both pluses and minuses. On the one hand, it contributes to making her more of a musician's and songwriter's singer - while on the other, it can narrow her overall appeal, since a listener who doesn't relate to the character exploration and emotion expressed may find little else by way of power vocals, catchy melody or memorable hooks to enjoy.

    On the two specific points you've referred to - I do find the "wronged woman" aspect in many of her songs believable. As a child, Miranda was close to real life abuse. Her parents (former police officers, who had started their own detective agency) were persuaded by their church to provide a refuge for abused women, and they opened their house on a number of occasions to victims and their children. Miranda grew up hearing the stories and witnessing the trauma of temporary house guests who were fleeing abuse.

    We, as listeners, never really see far into the personal side of our singers' lives (and it's right that that should be so), so there are dangers in projecting our own views onto Carrie, Miranda, or anyone else - but there are, nevertheless, aspects of Miranda's attitudes and posts that I find believable - from the lack of confidence that she sometimes shows, the closeness to her family, the way she's said she grew up in a conservative town, but learnt to be tolerant of diversity, her criticism of award shows for praising abusers, to little touches like posting a wordless picture of herself lying down on a New York sidewalk in answer to another singer's thoughtless description of the deceased Outlaw Country singers of the past as drug addicts falling in the gutter. No artist will ever be to everyone's taste, and all will have detractors, but Miranda's commitment to my music is something I find credible, and do appreciate.

    The second point you raised, in relation to looking back to the past, is significant in valuing Country Music as a continuum. Much of Miranda's music is forward looking and experimental - she and her band could never fairly be described as "traditionalist". But the music has a past as well as a future, and a Roots artist needs to draw on the past as well as take the music in new directions. This aspect was well understood by earlier artists, like Linda Ronstadt and Loretta Lynn, that she and Carrie have both admired and covered. Carrie made two thematic references to Bobbie Gentry on Storyteller (CCA to "Ode to Billie Joe" and CB to "Fancy"). Those were '70s rooted artists - and I see both Carrie and Miranda as each playing a part in restoring something of the mood of that era, as an antidote to the greater genre-blurring of the '90s. That is also there, especially in the showcase performances - but the continuum requires you to dig deeply across the years.
    For reasons that are emotional and historic, the Country world seems to look particularly to its women to keep alive the spirit of the music. "Who shall watch the home place?". Carrie has a depth of understanding of the music's roots - and I try to point this out when I review or comment on her songs. But I have to admit, you sometimes have to dig a bit to find her references - and some are not willing to do that. Miranda wears her heart more on her sleeve when it comes to musical references. But I find her approach to the past - both loving and critical - to be both believable and desirable in the current scene.

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    Thanks, Faraway, you said all of that so much better than the rest of us could. I truly do feel that Miranda is an "old soul" indeed and coming from a tiny Texas town, things probably progressed more slowly there than in more urban cities/states. I, as a teenager in the mid-late 90s, used a "blank cassette" to record songs from the radio, and since Miranda is only a few years younger than me, I certainly feel she did the same thing. I also remember the Rand McNally road maps my parents had and we used on road trips in the 80s, so it is perfectly conceivable to think that Miranda's family would have done the same when driving to Dallas. I really don't see how anyone can assume that Miranda didn't experience the things in Automatic, because she isn't that young and she came from a small town where the way of life is often different.
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    Carrie Guru pklongbeach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Farawayhills View Post
    I think what we find believable or unbelievable in an artist's song themes and interpretation is heavily coloured by our personal preferences (both stylistic and artist-centred), by the other music we mainly listen to, by the image we've formed of the singer's personality, and by the back-story we've heard about his or her background and beliefs.

    Comparisons between Carrie and Miranda are disliked by many fans, and are often rather circuitous or lead to the "obvious" conclusion that we prefer what we prefer!
    But as a couple of points that can touch on the artists' role and emphasis in Country Music have been raised, I'll try to address them.

    Both ladies have, in my opinion, always had songs that seem credible and convincing expressions of things that mean a lot to them. Like you. I find Carrie's "faith songs" very convincing as stemming from something that's a big part of who she is. I also find some of her early songs convincing because they include references that it's easy to believe are semi-autobiographical. "Don't Forget To Remember Me" (which she adopted) and "Crazy Dreams" (which she co-wrote) are cases in point. I know that Carrie never experienced the trauma of "Just a Dream" - but I still find the empathy and emotion in the song very believable.

    In Carrie's case, though, there are other songs that she appears to me to have less personal connection with. She sings them very well, and gives a thoroughly entertaining and professional performance - but she seems to have a degree of detachment from many of her songs as a narrator, who "sings" the song more than "lives" the song. (If this was just my opinion, it would be largely irrelevant - but I do think it's quite widely shared by others who see her way that way.) I think it's both helped her to wide appeal and commercial success, since she "presents" stage and recorded songs to audiences in a way that they can find their own reasons to understand and like - but has also tended to harm her with some critics and fellow musicians, who can often see her approach as more distant and less involved. I'd suggest songs like "Last Name", "All American Girl" and "Cowboy Casanova" (which have proven fan favourites and commercial successes) have, nevertheless, contributed to giving Carrie a reputation for being the public face (and, on the female side, the best exponent) of the "Nashville Hit Machine" - loved by radio and the public, but not always wining the same degree of critical support.

    I think Carrie's second and third studio albums (especially the latter) did a lot to entrench that dichotomy, and although I think BA was a much more experimental and adventurous album, it seemed to do relatively little to change the views that had taken hold. That's why I was particularly pleased with "Storyteller". Unlike some fans here, I found the lead single, SB (and its video), perfect for setting the scene - I found it one of Carrie's most empathetic and "involved" performances - and it led into an album that was both experimental, and, in several of the songs, her most personal yet. (Was SB "preachy"? - perhaps - but I'll take a "message" song over a "fun" song almost any time)

    Turning to Miranda - I think the reaction to her general work has often been the mirror image to that described above - less radio and commercial success, more critical and musician approval. And to me, that's often been understandable. No artist hits the button every time - but in her best work, she can lay bare her characters' emotions in ways that make her one of the most "involved" expressive singers in the genre today. To me, examples such as "More Like Her", "Bathroom Sink" and (remarkably) some of her very early songs, are highly believable - and that has both pluses and minuses. On the one hand, it contributes to making her more of a musician's and songwriter's singer - while on the other, it can narrow her overall appeal, since a listener who doesn't relate to the character exploration and emotion expressed may find little else by way of power vocals, catchy melody or memorable hooks to enjoy.

    On the two specific points you've referred to - I do find the "wronged woman" aspect in many of her songs believable. As a child, Miranda was close to real life abuse. Her parents (former police officers, who had started their own detective agency) were persuaded by their church to provide a refuge for abused women, and they opened their house on a number of occasions to victims and their children. Miranda grew up hearing the stories and witnessing the trauma of temporary house guests who were fleeing abuse.

    We, as listeners, never really see far into the personal side of our singers' lives (and it's right that that should be so), so there are dangers in projecting our own views onto Carrie, Miranda, or anyone else - but there are, nevertheless, aspects of Miranda's attitudes and posts that I find believable - from the lack of confidence that she sometimes shows, the closeness to her family, the way she's said she grew up in a conservative town, but learnt to be tolerant of diversity, her criticism of award shows for praising abusers, to little touches like posting a wordless picture of herself lying down on a New York sidewalk in answer to another singer's thoughtless description of the deceased Outlaw Country singers of the past as drug addicts falling in the gutter. No artist will ever be to everyone's taste, and all will have detractors, but Miranda's commitment to my music is something I find credible, and do appreciate.

    The second point you raised, in relation to looking back to the past, is significant in valuing Country Music as a continuum. Much of Miranda's music is forward looking and experimental - she and her band could never fairly be described as "traditionalist". But the music has a past as well as a future, and a Roots artist needs to draw on the past as well as take the music in new directions. This aspect was well understood by earlier artists, like Linda Ronstadt and Loretta Lynn, that she and Carrie have both admired and covered. Carrie made two thematic references to Bobbie Gentry on Storyteller (CCA to "Ode to Billie Joe" and CB to "Fancy"). Those were '70s rooted artists - and I see both Carrie and Miranda as each playing a part in restoring something of the mood of that era, as an antidote to the greater genre-blurring of the '90s. That is also there, especially in the showcase performances - but the continuum requires you to dig deeply across the years.
    For reasons that are emotional and historic, the Country world seems to look particularly to its women to keep alive the spirit of the music. "Who shall watch the home place?". Carrie has a depth of understanding of the music's roots - and I try to point this out when I review or comment on her songs. But I have to admit, you sometimes have to dig a bit to find her references - and some are not willing to do that. Miranda wears her heart more on her sleeve when it comes to musical references. But I find her approach to the past - both loving and critical - to be both believable and desirable in the current scene.
    Thank you so much for your thoughtful post. I highlighted some elements that seemed to ring particularly true with me. Its true that there is plenty of music from Carrie that does not "work" for me. But because of her singing ability I am able to find those things I appreciate about them inspite of themselves. (and I do think its true that I excuse a lot out of a particular affection I feel for her efforts in general.) And because I don't have the same attachment to Mirandas natural abilities and no particular affection for her efforts in general, there is no doubt I can be more "specific in my critiques".
    In this thread I will make special effort to bare in mind the reason and the nature of the proceedings and find a softer tone about what I am experiencing.
    Expressing with sincere effort but committing to my honest opinion.
    Ha ha ha fingers still crossed that I will actually love it as much as Famous.......(which I would argue is one of the smartest "country songs" to be written in a long while)
    Farawayhills likes this.

  • #20
    Insane Carrie Fan Farawayhills's Avatar
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    It's also worth remembering that "Automatic" wasn't just about Miranda and her experiences. It was co-written by Nicolle Galyon (who has described herself as something of a specialist in "home town" memory songs), and Natalie Hemby (who is the daughter of a Country songwriter of a preceding generation). All three have said they collaborated on suggesting different images for the song.

    Some of the touches in "Automatic" are Miranda's own - and these were carried into the video. The 1950s blue Chevy truck is really what she first drove - it was a present from her father, and she still drives it occasionally. For me, the real clincher in that video was the feather boa that she gets out of the trunk in the attic - it was the old fan emblem for the Dixie Chicks, which they tied to their mike stands, and which some of the girls used to wave at concerts. That brought back memories of the "ain't skeered" days - and that touch was pure Miranda. Her current tour coincided with theirs, but after much criss-crossing of the Mid West, she and her bevy of friends, in two vintage Airstreams, finally crossed the border into Canada, and watched her "sheroes" concerts for two nights. (That, though, doesn't beat my Irish friend, who crossed the Atlantic to see them in North America eight times!)

    I certainly don't share the dislike some have expressed for Miranda's homage to the past (which is, after all, only a small part of her total repertoire).
    If anyone would care to hear Brent Cobb's original version of "Old S**t" (which he wrote as a tribute to his grandfather), this is it:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVIAj3yNUs8
    I give Miranda a lot of credit for finding and honouring relatively unlikely music like this, and presenting it to a Mainstream audience.
    (She wasn't involved in writing that song, but she did provide a song for Brent's cousin's acclaimed "Southern Family" album, and has a new co-write with him, which is a possible for her next album)
    Last edited by Farawayhills; 07-28-2016 at 08:02 AM.
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