Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 40
Like Tree58Likes

Thread: Luke on country's woman problem: I do think it sucks, but I don't know what I can do

  1. #1
    Insane Carrie Fan gaycarebear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    N/C
    Posts
    5,472

    Luke on country's woman problem: I do think it sucks, but I don't know what I can do

    Here are Bryanís full thoughts on the matter:
    ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Are women in country getting the short end of the stick?
    LUKE BRYAN: Itís disappointing that itís so tough for a female artist to break. I donít know really the demographics of why that is and what makes that so tough on women. I donít know. I donít know why thatís so tough. I do think it sucks, but I donít know what I can do. I mean, itís a weird phenomenon. Whatís funny is that the majority of listeners are females, but then youíd feel like they would want to hear women too. I guess I didnít give you at all an answer, but I just feel like I donít know what can be done to solve it. I think historically itís always been that way a little bit. It feels like now is the toughest time ever for women, but I would imagine itís always been pretty damn crummy.

    Yeah.
    Overall in country, itís a different deal because itís tough for a girl to, at the age of 16, start hitting the honky tonks. Itís justÖ [sighs] that the landscape in the minor leagues for women are tougher in country. My radio tour, back when I was singing two shows a day, Iíd have to wake up, throw on a hat. A lot of times girls, you knowóitís just a tough time for girls to pull off those early days and radio tours, too. And I donít want anybody calling me saying, ďWhy are you saying girls arenít tough enough?Ē But Iíve thought about it a lot and why it happens, but at the end of the day, I canít put my finger on it.

    But why wouldnít they be able to do that? Iím not following.
    In my opinion, the girls that make it, man, they can wake up early at 5 a.m., throw a hat on, roll into a radio station, hang with the guys. They kind of have to be able to hang with the guys but also be feminine and pretty, and itís just a tough dynamic when you talk about that aspect. Itís nothing thatóthereís probably not even any merit to what Iím saying, but itís just stuff Iíve thought about through the years. I remember waking up, and you know, hell, Iíd hop in the shower quickly. Some girls on radio tours, it will take them two hours to get all dolled up to do three songs for a radio guy. They do two hours worth of glam. I mean, Itís tough, you know?


    Luke Bryan on country's woman problem: 'I don't know what I can do' | The Music Mix | EW.com
    opry051008 and rainbow1 like this.

  • #2
    Carrie Guru
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    17,945
    Concert Stars
    The # 1 problem that the female artist has is that to this point nobody outside of the Big 3 has done anything with a second single and until that happens nobody other than the Big 3 are going to become anything more than being labeled as the "Next Women of Country".

  • #3
    Carrie Guru Claire2004's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    the library. lol
    Posts
    11,128
    I'm sure Luke has a lot of strengths, but eloquence apparently is not one of them lol. Sorry for my snarky post, I have nothing against Luke, but reading that interview is kinda painful.

  • #4
    Carrie Fans Legend teesharky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Saratoga NY
    Posts
    76,614
    Concert Stars
    haha I was just coming here to post this! Poor Luke. He meant well- but he just doesn't have a whole lot of articulate thoughts. lol

    I don't think the men in country music really think about this issue or care-- because it benefits them to have 3 token females in country music while men dominate.

  • #5
    Insane Carrie Fan gaycarebear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    N/C
    Posts
    5,472
    I think what he meant to say (and which he started off with before being derailed into the ridiculous "glam" notions) was that women are held to a higher standard than males by the country fans, in general. One member posted in a thread recently (I think it was the Luke thread) saying she loved him because he was cute, even if his music is mediocre at best.

    Yup. Country music is so f***ed up.
    teesharky likes this.

  • #6
    Carrie Fans Legend teesharky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Saratoga NY
    Posts
    76,614
    Concert Stars
    This was my reply to the article:


    • The Radio Programmers need to stop perpetuating an outdated, invalid stereotype that Female listeners only want to hear Male Hotties on the Radio. That is BOGUS. As a female, I just want to hear songs I can enjoy and relate to- songs that move me and make me laugh, cry, sing along. I am so dang tired of the same Frat-Boy songs about Beer, trucks, and Tractors or Pretty Girls on the radio. Is that the level of creativity that we have succumed to? What ever happened to great country songs like Strawberry Wine or Whiskey Lullaby? It is terrible what kind of crap is being played on country radio these days in general, but the dominance of males is getting out of control to the point of nausea: If I hear one more song about beers or trucks, I might hurl.
    • Females like Carrie Underwood and Miranda Lambert are leading a strong charge with strong songwriting, great beats, and meaningful themes. Sure they both have some upbeat, Bad-boy edgy songs that are just fun, but they also put out gems like Blown Away or The House That Built Me. These 2 ladies are the future of country music for women- and thank God for them.
      But why can't country radio also play more Ashley Monroe, Kasey Musgraves, Ashton Shephard, Leann Rimes, Kellie Pickler, Gretchen Wilson? There are alot of country females out there with great songwriting, pleasant voices and interesting material. Why are they not getting a chance?

    • Enough Taylor Swift as she is not remotely country, nor can she sing on key. But give us more Sunny Sweeney, Sarah Darling, Lauren Alaina. Poor Kellie Pickler has put out some great material lately but radio won't play it.

    • Kimberly Perry of The Band Perry has great success, but as part of a group made up of males too. Same with Hillary Scott of Lady Antebellum, and the ladies of Little Big Town. Apparently-- women are welcome in country music- but only if part of a Band made up partially by men. Pretty sad.

    • Instead- we get more beer, more trucks, more frat-Boy country songs that make my ears bleed. Are we really that uninspired? Is this the new Country music of this generation? If so, i fear for the genre.

    • But I blame radio programmers for focusing on out-dated, inaccurate assumptions that females don't support female artists. That is bogus. Most of the audience at a sold out Carrie Underwood show is filled with women of all ages-- from teens to seniors. Their husbands come too, and she has many male fans-- but it is largely women that support Carrie Underwood. So what is the problem here? Why is there 1 female in the top 10 on any given chart week, with 9 mediocre songs by men?

    • I love a good looking male country singer just as much as the next girl, but in the end, it is about the MUSIC, not their gender, and not how good looking they are. I don't care if you are Male, Female, Young, old, skinny, Fat, pretty, ugly, Gay Straight: JUST GIVE ME GOOD MUSIC!
      It is terrible that Radio Programmers- most of whom are MEN- continue to perpetuate this invalid stereotype that we females do not support other females in music. I call BS.

  • #7
    Ultimate Carrie Fan Farawayhills's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    England
    Posts
    6,939
    Luke's is a rather rambling response to the question - but, to be fair, this is not really a question for him. It's a question for the recording companies that determine the promotion and the radio stations that determine the playlists. That question usually leads to the issue of audience tastes (and Bryan alludes to that, when he suspects that the majority demographic doesn't seem to want more women on air). But that always involves a "chicken and egg" situation - is it more the audience dictating what the stations play, or more the stations creating the audience perceptions of what current "Country" is mainly about? What I will say on that is that (as a broad generalization) Roots audiences are more willing to seek out new music that radio is typically not playing, while Mainstream audiences are more dependent on having their perceptions influenced by what they hear and see on high profile, popular outlets, and on what large numbers of other people see as a trend.

    Luke Bryan also mentions one aspect that, in many cases, is probably true. He says that girls can find it tough to "hit the honky tonks", and that "the landscape in the minor leagues for women are tougher in country. "
    Now it turns out that, apparently, Luke Bryan did "hit the honky tonks" in his youth (though there may be little sign of that now in his Mainstream studio style) - so he presumably has some idea of the difficult environment young women may face in shaping a career on the road with no recording contract.
    I'll show just one example of what Luke may have in mind (This is Melissa Swingle, pursuing near solo dates, with just a female drummer, after her band, Trailer Bride, went on hiatus)



    Melissa was already an experienced club and small venue artist - but I think that route can be uncongenial for many girls starting up. Carrie alluded to this problem when she said she had little idea how to pursue an independent career in music, and would probably have given up without American Idol. If that's widely true, it implies that girls may be particularly dependent on being "discovered" by the established "machine" - which puts much of the focus back on why the record companies are not signing more, or promoting more beyond an initial release

    (I will say, though, that the string band festivals are probably a friendlier ground for girls than the honky tonks and roadhouses)
    opry051008, teesharky and rainbow1 like this.

  • #8
    Insane Carrie Fan gaycarebear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    N/C
    Posts
    5,472
    ^When I interviewed Jamie awhile back, she noted that the solo female recording deal was the HARDEST deal to land. Record companies already know the battle they'd face with signing them...so thus they don't.

  • #9
    Carrie Fans Legend teesharky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Saratoga NY
    Posts
    76,614
    Concert Stars
    Can I ask a question? Where is the proof that women only want to hear men on the radio? I challenged these alleged "demographics" as out-dated and invalid. Where is the proof of this? I don't buy it.

    Even Taylor-- as pop as she is-- does appeal to FEMALES, not males. The majority of her fanbase is teen girls.

    Carrie's fanbase is split more, and goes all ages- but she does have a majority of females at her shows over men. She has more male fans then Taylor, but there are generally more females at her shows then males.

    So where is this proof coming from that females don't want to hear female country singers on the radio? I need to see the data. I don't believe it is accurate. Not for a second.
    rainbow1 likes this.

  • #10
    Carrie Guru
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    17,945
    Concert Stars
    Quote Originally Posted by teesharky View Post
    Can I ask a question? Where is the proof that women only want to hear men on the radio? I challenged these alleged "demographics" as out-dated and invalid. Where is the proof of this? I don't buy it.

    Even Taylor-- as pop as she is-- does appeal to FEMALES, not males. The majority of her fanbase is teen girls.

    Carrie's fanbase is split more, and goes all ages- but she does have a majority of females at her shows over men. She has more male fans then Taylor, but there are generally more females at her shows then males.

    So where is this proof coming from that females don't want to hear female country singers on the radio? I need to see the data. I don't believe it is accurate. Not for a second.
    Only want to hear the male artists is the wrong word to use but majority of women prefer to listen to the male artist would be more accurate because if a majority would rather listen to female artist there would be a Big 4 or 5 instead of there only being a Big 3.

  • #11
    Carrie Fans Legend teesharky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Saratoga NY
    Posts
    76,614
    Concert Stars
    Why though? It makes no sense. And I still want to see these so-called demographics. Do the programmers actually research this issue with reliable polls or date or whatever--- or do they just make assumptions based on outdated generalizations?

    Alot of women like Miranda too....so I don't get where this theory comes from to be honest. If you go to a Shania concert, it is mostly females too in the audience, with some men who find her hot there too. haha Same with Carrie's shows.

    Dixie Chicks had largely female fans too. So there is evidence that Females support Female artists.

  • #12
    Ultimate Carrie Fan Carrieflattsfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Home
    Posts
    7,830
    Concert Stars
    I think the whole issue of why women aren't as successful in country music is pretty complex; there isn't really one answer.

    Women have always had it harder than the men in any profession, and it's probably much more difficult in the entertainment industry, with all the added pressure. When your success depends on the consumers buying a product, it's always iffy. If radio programmers are gearing music towards a female audience, it's because that formula has been proven to work. Women aren't played on the radio and signed as often as the men, because historically the men are the ones who bring in the most money and attract the most buzz.

    We've had Garth, Kenny, Strait. Bryan, Aldean, etc, bringing in huge numbers and making a name for the genre. When you look at the females, the list probably only includes Loretta, Tammy, Dolly, Shania, Carrie, and Taylor overall. There can only be so many stars that standout, and that is even tougher for females, considering only a limited number breakthrough (let alone become superstars), and then they've got to create a balance to keep their audience.

    The males have it much easier in every aspect, because there are endless slots for the males to fill, there will always be a market for them, and generally they tend to receive more attention and support from the music audience and industry.

    The fact that these guys can release the same song about trucks and beer 1,0000 times and have it shoot to number one and help move albums, while women cannot even be promised a follow-up radio hit IF they even breakthrough says it all, IMO.

    The women are held to unfair standards because there are a limited number of spots for them, and they have to find a perfect balance of appealing to females and males. Some country listeners seem very turned off by a female artist who has a more abrasive personality, and those who have a more laid-back sound probably won't appeal to the same female crowd buying Carrie and Taylor albums.

    The women have a much harder battle, and I'm sure these guys notice. Which is why it's a shame they are wasting so many opportunities to make awful music, in my opinion. Maybe if the public stopped supporting all this garbage and appreciated more women, the country music industry wouldn't be in such a dire situation. There's no balance right now, but if the public and labels keep supporting the males this way, nothing will change.

    It's such a catch-22, ugh.

  • #13
    Carrie Fans Legend teesharky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Saratoga NY
    Posts
    76,614
    Concert Stars
    I am posting Windmills excellent Reply to the Article here:

    Windmills Country2 hours ago

    Luke Bryan: In my opinion, the girls that make it, man, they can wake up early at 5 a.m., throw a hat on, roll into a radio station, hang with the guys. They kind of have to be able to hang with the guys but also be feminine and pretty, and it’s just a tough dynamic when you talk about that aspect. It’s nothing that—there’s probably not even any merit to what I’m saying, but it’s just stuff I’ve thought about through the years. I remember waking up, and you know, hell, I’d hop in the shower quickly. Some girls on radio tours, it will take them two hours to get all dolled up to do three songs for a radio guy. They do two hours worth of glam.
    Well Luke Bryan, aren't you lucky you didn't have to squeeze yourself into those painted-on jeans (speaking of country cliches) back in your radio touring days?

    I give Luke credit for attempting to answer a tough question. Let's face it - he doesn't want to come off as if he's criticizing country fans as sexist, and he's sure as heck not going to start criticizing the country programmers who spin the crap out of his tunes for not giving women a fair chance (which is too bad). But man, did his train of thought ever derail. Luke was maybe, possibly onto something in talking about the radio tour scene - it's not just the radio tour performances themselves, but also the unstated expectation of after-hours availability for buddy-buddy drinking sessions with programmers when you're in town. That's inherently more awkward for a female seeking airplay from mostly male programmers, so that possibly gets in the way of male programmers getting as invested in female acts as their drinking pal male acts.

    That being said, Luke's "glam routine" train of thought is nothing short of ridiculous, and is refuted by the many, many women who have undertaken and completed country radio tours, including but not limited to Kacey Musgraves, Kelleigh Bannen, Kristen Kelly, Jana Kramer, Kellie Pickler, Lauren Alaina, Katrina Elam, Julie Roberts, Shelly Fairchild, Mallary Hope, Emily West, Katie Armiger, Sarah Darling, and the list goes on and on and on (including females currently on radio tours like Leah Turner and Voice alums Cassadee Pope and Danielle Bradbery). Heck, Sheryl Crow went on a major radio tour despite the fact that she's already a big name.

    Luke was also maybe, possibly, onto something when he speculated about the expectations placed on women - it sure seems like the pop culture gossip mill requires women to walk a narrower path as far as their personalities (be friendly but not too familiar, not ditzy but not smarter than the room, and so on), looks (attractive but not too attractive seems to work best, "if you can't lose the weight then you're just fat, but if you lose too much then you're on crack," to quote Kacey Musgraves), and dating patterns. I don't think this is exclusive to the country world though - it sure seems to extend to the reality TV personality world, including Idol (remember the whole WGWG reign?), not that there isn't overlap between country fans and reality TV (especially talent competition) fans. It seems to extend throughout the gossip world too.

    But empirically, Luke has outdated information if he really thinks a great majority of country radio listeners are female. Recent Arbitron ratings as reported in May by Country Aircheck said the format's audience tilts only slightly towards females but is close to a 50-50 gender split. Callout data from Bullsi certainly doesn't point to a lack of receptivity among females for songs by females. Carrie Underwood's "See You Again" (which was ranked atop the Callout America charts for weeks based on multigenerational appeal to both genders) was a top ranked song by females 18+. Kellie Pickler's "Someone Somewhere Tonight" scored big passion numbers (enough to rank in the top 20 in that metric), especially among females. The current single from Jana Kramer is testing top 20 among females 18-34, but ranked #24 in the 18-34 demo when males are factored in.

    The problem may actually be in the male 18-34 demo, whose top 10 ranked songs at Callout America 2 weeks ago were: Lee Brice's "Parking Lot Party," Florida Georgia Line's "Round Here," Justin Moore's "Point At You," Kenny Chesney's "When I See This Bar," Jason Aldean's "Night Train," Thomas Rhett's "It Goes Like This," "Don't Ya" by Brett Eldredge, "Redneck Crazy" by Tyler Farr, "Runnin Outta Moonlight" by Randy Houser, and "Aw Naw" by Chris Young. Not just a sausagefest, but the top 10 favorites appear to crystallize around a particular type of song (excepting the Chesney track).

    That being said, programmers who argue their research simply doesn't favor female tracks leave out the fact that familiarity generally results in more favorable callout and the fact that so many non-established female acts aren't given the chance to attain that critical mass of familiarity to grow on the audience. That generates a self-reinforcing cycle that's difficult for females to break. By contrast, especially as the males release more generic songs within the narrow band Grady describes in his article, it's easier to attain that initial familiarity because listeners will feel like they've likely heard the song before.

    Male country singers these days blend together more easily because they're releasing such similar singles, which is also why so many new male acts struggle to sell albums despite hits. See: Randy Houser, whose album has sold about 2/3 what Kacey Musgraves's album has sold despite Houser's album yielding 2 #1 hits (compared to Kacey's #10 hit and #23 peaking single) and being released 2 months earlier. Or take Brett Eldredge, whose #1, gold-certified single "Don't Ya" led to 1st week sales of 21k compared to the 44k Kacey sold 1st week.
    HuiZ and rainbow1 like this.

  • #14
    Carrie Guru
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    17,945
    Concert Stars
    Quote Originally Posted by teesharky View Post
    Why though? It makes no sense. And I still want to see these so-called demographics. Do the programmers actually research this issue with reliable polls or date or whatever--- or do they just make assumptions based on outdated generalizations?

    Alot of women like Miranda too....so I don't get where this theory comes from to be honest. If you go to a Shania concert, it is mostly females too in the audience, with some men who find her hot there too. haha Same with Carrie's shows.

    Dixie Chicks had largely female fans too. So there is evidence that Females support Female artists.
    Nobody is saying that female fans don't support female artist, but it's a fact and not an opinion that female fans give more support to the male artist because if that wasn't true someone besides Carrie, Miranda or Taylor would have done something by now.

  • #15
    Insane Carrie Fan gaycarebear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    N/C
    Posts
    5,472
    Quote Originally Posted by JB172 View Post
    Nobody is saying that female fans don't support female artist, but it's a fact and not an opinion that female fans give more support to the male artist because if that wasn't true someone besides Carrie, Miranda or Taylor would have done something by now.
    See Windmills response:

    Well Luke Bryan, aren't you lucky you didn't have to squeeze yourself into those painted-on jeans (speaking of country cliches) back in your radio touring days? I give Luke credit for attempting to answer a tough question. Let's face it - he doesn't want to come off as if he's criticizing country fans as sexist, and he's sure as heck not going to start criticizing the country programmers who spin the crap out of his tunes for not giving women a fair chance (which is too bad). But man, did his train of thought ever derail. Luke was maybe, possibly onto something in talking about the radio tour scene - it's not just the radio tour performances themselves, but also the unstated expectation of after-hours availability for buddy-buddy drinking sessions with programmers when you're in town. That's inherently more awkward for a female seeking airplay from mostly male programmers, so that possibly gets in the way of male programmers getting as invested in female acts as their drinking pal male acts.

    That being said, Luke's "glam routine" train of thought is nothing short of ridiculous, and is refuted by the many, many women who have undertaken and completed country radio tours, including but not limited to Kacey Musgraves, Kelleigh Bannen, Kristen Kelly, Jana Kramer, Kellie Pickler, Lauren Alaina, Katrina Elam, Julie Roberts, Shelly Fairchild, Mallary Hope, Emily West, Katie Armiger, Sarah Darling, and the list goes on and on and on (including females currently on radio tours like Leah Turner and Voice alums Cassadee Pope and Danielle Bradbery). Heck, Sheryl Crow went on a major radio tour despite the fact that she's already a big name.

    Luke was also maybe, possibly, onto something when he speculated about the expectations placed on women - it sure seems like the pop culture gossip mill requires women to walk a narrower path as far as their personalities (be friendly but not too familiar, not ditzy but not smarter than the room, and so on), looks (attractive but not too attractive seems to work best, "if you can't lose the weight then you're just fat, but if you lose too much then you're on crack," to quote Kacey Musgraves), and dating patterns. I don't think this is exclusive to the country world though - it sure seems to extend to the reality TV personality world, including Idol (remember the whole WGWG reign?), not that there isn't overlap between country fans and reality TV (especially talent competition) fans. It seems to extend throughout the gossip world too.

    But empirically, Luke has outdated information if he really thinks a great majority of country radio listeners are female. Recent Arbitron ratings as reported in May by Country Aircheck said the format's audience tilts only slightly towards females but is close to a 50-50 gender split. Callout data from Bullsi certainly doesn't point to a lack of receptivity among females for songs by females. Carrie Underwood's "See You Again" (which was ranked atop the Callout America charts for weeks based on multigenerational appeal to both genders) was a top ranked song by females 18+. Kellie Pickler's "Someone Somewhere Tonight" scored big passion numbers (enough to rank in the top 20 in that metric), especially among females. The current single from Jana Kramer is testing top 20 among females 18-34, but ranked #24 in the 18-34 demo when males are factored in.
    The problem may actually be in the male 18-34 demo, whose top 10 ranked songs at Callout America 2 weeks ago were: Lee Brice's "Parking Lot Party," Florida Georgia Line's "Round Here," Justin Moore's "Point At You," Kenny Chesney's "When I See This Bar," Jason Aldean's "Night Train," Thomas Rhett's "It Goes Like This," "Don't Ya" by Brett Eldredge, "Redneck Crazy" by Tyler Farr, "Runnin Outta Moonlight" by Randy Houser, and "Aw Naw" by Chris Young. Not just a sausagefest, but the top 10 favorites appear to crystallize around a particular type of song (excepting the Chesney track).

    That being said, programmers who argue their research simply doesn't favor female tracks leave out the fact that familiarity generally results in more favorable callout and the fact that so many non-established female acts aren't given the chance to attain that critical mass of familiarity to grow on the audience. That generates a self-reinforcing cycle that's difficult for females to break. By contrast, especially as the males release more generic songs within the narrow band Grady describes in his article, it's easier to attain that initial familiarity because listeners will feel like they've likely heard the song before.

    Male country singers these days blend together more easily because they're releasing such similar singles, which is also why so many new male acts struggle to sell albums despite hits. See: Randy Houser, whose album has sold about 2/3 what Kacey Musgraves's album has sold despite Houser's album yielding 2 #1 hits (compared to Kacey's #10 hit and #23 peaking single) and being released 2 months earlier. Or take Brett Eldredge, whose #1, gold-certified single "Don't Ya" led to 1st week sales of 21k compared to the 44k Kacey sold 1st week.
    Carrieflattsfan and rainbow1 like this.

  • #16
    Carrie Guru
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    17,945
    Concert Stars
    Jason, I don't care if the percentage is 70% male and 30% female, if the fans wanted to listen to a female on a consistent basis not named Carrie, Miranda or Taylor they would.

    Excuse after excuse after excuse can be made and female artist after female artist after female artist can be rolled out as being the "Next Women of Country" but if they can't put out a second single that does anything to follow up their first hit single then there is not going to be anyone to go compete with Carrie, Miranda or Taylor.

    People on this site go on and on and on about Reba & company trying to make Kelly a country superstar, well she has had singles on the radio and they didn't do anything, so if Reba & Co. has all this power why can't Kelly do better on the charts?

    Maybe it's because people are just not interested and not because the poor female artists don't get a chance to succeed, it's true that female artist have a tougher time in making it but I will NEVER buy that it's more the industry trying to hold then down instead of fans just NOT being interested.
    supercarriefan likes this.

  • #17
    Insane Carrie Fan gaycarebear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    N/C
    Posts
    5,472
    Ok. Whatever.
    rainbow1 likes this.

  • #18
    Carrie Guru
    maddkat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Louisville
    Posts
    23,287
    Concert Stars
    Quote Originally Posted by JB172 View Post
    Jason, I don't care if the percentage is 70% male and 30% female, if the fans wanted to listen to a female on a consistent basis not named Carrie, Miranda or Taylor they would.

    Excuse after excuse after excuse can be made and female artist after female artist after female artist can be rolled out as being the "Next Women of Country" but if they can't put out a second single that does anything to follow up their first hit single then there is not going to be anyone to go compete with Carrie, Miranda or Taylor.

    People on this site go on and on and on about Reba & company trying to make Kelly a country superstar, well she has had singles on the radio and they didn't do anything, so if Reba & Co. has all this power why can't Kelly do better on the charts?

    Maybe it's because people are just not interested and not because the poor female artists don't get a chance to succeed, it's true that female artist have a tougher time in making it but I will NEVER buy that it's more the industry trying to hold then down instead of fans just NOT being interested.
    I agree that most of the music put out by the women trying to break in is underwhelming.But they can't get heard if they're not played,so how are people suppose to support them?
    90% of the music by males - those trying to break in or established is underwhelming too and radio plays the heck out it.

    I guess my question for radio is why do you play the crap by the males but not the females.And I guess their answer would be that radio listeners want to hear the males.But if they only play the males how is the listener suppose to know what they're missing with the females.Idk, radio is too confusing.

  • #19
    Ultimate Carrie Fan HuiZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Home
    Posts
    6,370
    Quote Originally Posted by teesharky View Post
    The problem may actually be in the male 18-34 demo, whose top 10 ranked songs at Callout America 2 weeks ago were: Lee Brice's "Parking Lot Party," Florida Georgia Line's "Round Here," Justin Moore's "Point At You," Kenny Chesney's "When I See This Bar," Jason Aldean's "Night Train," Thomas Rhett's "It Goes Like This," "Don't Ya" by Brett Eldredge, "Redneck Crazy" by Tyler Farr, "Runnin Outta Moonlight" by Randy Houser, and "Aw Naw" by Chris Young. Not just a sausagefest, but the top 10 favorites appear to crystallize around a particular type of song (excepting the Chesney track).

    .........

    Male country singers these days blend together more easily because they're releasing such similar singles, which is also why so many new male acts struggle to sell albums despite hits. See: Randy Houser, whose album has sold about 2/3 what Kacey Musgraves's album has sold despite Houser's album yielding 2 #1 hits (compared to Kacey's #10 hit and #23 peaking single) and being released 2 months earlier. Or take Brett Eldredge, whose #1, gold-certified single "Don't Ya" led to 1st week sales of 21k compared to the 44k Kacey sold 1st week.
    Hah. So the problem actually lies with male listeners. =P

  • #20
    Carrie Guru rainbow1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    15,350
    Concert Stars
    Maybe the male PD's are just egotistical enough to think that females would rather listen to males!!


  •  
    Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

    Similar Threads

    1. Country Music's Year of the Woman
      By matsche1190 in forum New Member Welcome
      Replies: 11
      Last Post: 09-09-2013, 12:37 AM
    2. VOTE - Who is the Hotest Woman in Country Music (93.1 WPOC)
      By Ann055 in forum Carrie Underwood Voting Threads
      Replies: 16
      Last Post: 11-19-2012, 07:28 PM
    3. Country Weekly: Country's Most Beautiful Woman
      By maddkat in forum Carrie Underwood Voting Threads
      Replies: 14
      Last Post: 11-16-2012, 04:28 PM
    4. Country Weekly...Who is Country Music's most beautiful Woman?
      By jaylee50 in forum Carrie Underwood Voting Threads
      Replies: 2
      Last Post: 10-26-2012, 03:44 PM
    5. Carrie voted Country Weeklly's Most Beautiful Woman!
      By Carrieflattsfan in forum Carrie Underwood Chat
      Replies: 53
      Last Post: 01-04-2012, 10:37 AM

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •