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  1. #1
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    Carriefans members' English dialects

    A lot of Carriefans members live in the English-speaking locations.
    I'm familiar with standard American English but to contact a member in his dialect is a good thing I should do.
    Therefore, I try to talk with PK LongBeach in Californian English but Faraway Hills in British English.
    But it's always difficult because I don't know different English dialects well.

    I'm so excited to know your English dialects, their grammars and vocabularies
    Last edited by IdolCarrieAlwaysShines; 05-10-2014 at 11:27 AM.

  • #2
    Insane Carrie Fan buckeyecarriefan's Avatar
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    Where I'm from is technically in the "Inland Nothern American English" range(basically a Midwest accent like you'd hear in Chicago or Detroit), but we're far enough South in that that you could also consider us to be in the Midland North that you'd hear in Indianapolis or Columbus.

    Basically, the English we speak around here has long been the standard for American English pronunciation.

    As far as a couple of gramatical examples, around here it's "pop" not "soda", we get our water from a "faucet" not a "spigot", and "merry", "Mary", and "marry" all sound the same.

  • #3
    Insane Carrie Fan Marie2011's Avatar
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    I live in North Florida and here we say ya'll instead of you all and I know contractions are improper English but in elementary school we learn how to use contraction properly . So I'm gonna use them.

  • #4
    Ultimate Carrie Fan Farawayhills's Avatar
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    There are many British dialects - older words are used less and less with the spread of standard education and the influence of mass communications, but accents tend to persist for longer. It's still often possible to tell the region someone comes from from their accents, and regional accents are still often heard on TV - especially, at present, the "Geordie" accent of the North East (Tyneside) region, which has become fashionable in advertising and announcing.

    When people from overseas say "a British accent", they usually mean a general form of educated, non-regional English, which in this country tends to be called "Standard English", "BBC English", "the Queen's English" or "RP" (RP is a rather technical linguistic term which stands for "Received Pronunciation". (The second type of British accent which people may know, is the "Cockney" or London accent, often used in films. The only films where people from overseas are likely to hear traditional South- or West-country accents seem to be Pirate films, where, for some reason, the sailors are often shown talking that way...)

    The traditional Sussex accent has largely disappeared, and been replaced by a general South Eastern, urbanized, accent, similar to London English. For example, the word "fern" used to be pronounced "varn"round here, but you won't hear that nowadays. My grandmother used several dialect words that you won't hear today - for example she called an ant (insect) "an emmet", and a newt (salamander) "an eft". My own accent is basically Standard English, but I do use some pronunciations and spellings that would be considered old-fashioned or regional.

    If you're interested in the traditional Sussex dialect, there's a page on Wikipedia, explaining our county motto "We won't be druv" (driven) - which earlier would probably have been written "Us wunt be druv" (the form I was taught). On this page there's a poem from a hundred years ago, which illustrates some of the dialect.
    (The line "Mus Wilfred come to Sussex, us heaved a stone at he" is a reference to Sussex being the last region in Anglo-Saxon England that was still heathen - St Wilfred, a Northerner, came to convert the people, but was considered arrogant and resisted - he was only accepted when he showed love instead of superiority)
    We wunt be druv - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Today, the main differences you may still hear in Sussex speech include the adverbs "somewhen" and "anywhen" (as in "I'll see you somewhen"); the use of "twitten" for a narrow passage between fences or buildings; and the use of "trug" for a traditional wooden basket. These were once used for carrying almost anything, especially by women, but are now mainly used for gardening or fruit picking.
    Sussex trug - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  • #5
    Obsessed Carrie Fan tgbrinker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckeyecarriefan View Post
    Where I'm from is technically in the "Inland Nothern American English" range(basically a Midwest accent like you'd hear in Chicago or Detroit), but we're far enough South in that that you could also consider us to be in the Midland North that you'd hear in Indianapolis or Columbus.

    Basically, the English we speak around here has long been the standard for American English pronunciation.

    As far as a couple of gramatical examples, around here it's "pop" not "soda", we get our water from a "faucet" not a "spigot", and "merry", "Mary", and "marry" all sound the same.
    I'm from Minnesota and the above applies to me.

    Furthermore, I used very pronounced O's and I say 'bag' more like 'baeg'. Lot's of exaggerated 'AHs' in many words, but that's more small farm town than in the Twin Cities (grew up small town, now life in Minneapolis).

    All of the above is far more heightened when I'm angry. Or drunk.

    I'm in NYC right now for work and boy, the (somewhat stereotypical) east coast accents are THICK here, but magical in their own way.

  • #6
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    I'm from Eastern KY and while I don't know what the name might be for our accent, they can be quite thick. They aren't exactly a southern drawl. It's very Appalachian, I guess. Grammar often goes out the window in our dialect, ain't is used frequently, and the long "I" sound is very pronounced. It's hard to write how we say it, but I was in chorus in high school and our teacher did her best to train that "I" sound out of us when we sang. It's because of that and the fact that I moved to the Lexington area of KY in college that my accent is not noticeable. If I go out of state, people notice it, but most people in Central KY wouldn't know I'm from Appalachia.

  • #7
    Insane Carrie Fan carrieguy2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckeyecarriefan View Post

    "merry", "Mary", and "marry" all sound the same.
    and that drives me nuts!


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