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Thread: Cry Pretty Album Reviews

  1. #21
    Carrie Fans Legend teesharky's Avatar
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    There was a part part of The NY Times review that was pretty good actually.But that snippet was snarky as usual. When I read the actual full review- it’s not as bad as I feared.

    The positive parts were good: he liked the innovative sound on some songs.
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  • #22
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    Here's a nice review for everyone. Does this count for Metacritic, though, if they don't give an actual rating/score?

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/...al/1282830002/

    Broken relationships, substance abuse, gun violence -- Carrie Underwood’s “Cry Pretty” delves into much different kinds of pain than the one that fixed the public’s gaze on her face last year. A fall at her Nashville home required 40+ facial stitches and left her unable to sing for months in addition to delaying the album’s release.
    Underwood has fully healed in the months since the accident, and while she claimed it took some time for her diction to return to normal, she’s never sounded better than on “Cry Pretty,” the album’s 12 tracks spanning pop, country and R&B.
    Carrie Underwood: Accident changed her singing: 'Things felt different'
    As for that pesky fall, Underwood doesn’t address the incident head-on anywhere on the album, aside from one line on album closer “Kingdom” about “a creaky board on the front porch you swear you’re gonna fix soon.” Ostensibly addressed to her husband, Mike Fisher, the song is Underwood’s celebration of domestic bliss, on which the newly pregnant star -- she and Fisher already have a 3-year-old son, Isaiah -- plans ahead for life with one more child in the house, singing about having “two kids flying down the hall.”
    More: Carrie Underwood 'not quite looking the same' after needing 40+ stitches on face
    Aside from the HAIM-channeling love song “End Up With You” and “Love Wins,” which preaches unity in “a world that seems broken,” the rest of the album isn’t as rosy. Underwood assumes the role of a wistful ex-lover on several album highlights, including the soulful “Low” and “Ghosts on the Stereo” and the sexier “That Song That We Used To Make Love To,” a track that sounds swiped from an R&B vixen, with Underwood skillfully handling the track’s somersaulting melody.


    A darker take on love is “Spinning Bottles,” as Underwood tells the story of a relationship torn apart by addiction, a more honest look at country music’s hard-drinking trope. “The Bullet” expunges even more pain with Underwood’s storytelling about a family who loses a son to gun violence, and the quiet after “the camera crews have all moved on,” focusing on the shooting’s emotional ramifications while carefully keeping its message apolitical, as she sings, “You can blame it on hate or blame it on guns, but mamas ain’t supposed to bury their sons.”
    For some, Underwood’s side-stepping of the issue of gun control on “The Bullet” may seem like the cop-out of a star seeking to comment on current events without taking an actual stand, as does her use of “Love Wins” as a catch-all message of optimism, divorcing the phrase from the Supreme Court’s historic 2015 ruling legalizing marriage equality with which the phrase was widely associated. Consider that LGBT issues and gun control are two of the hottest-button issues in country music right now, and Underwood, as one of the genre’s biggest stars, is using her platform to encourage compassion -- albeit vaguely -- from her listeners.


    Besides, looking at Underwood's shining reputation, nobody is particularly clamoring for her to speak out on social issues. It's proof of how universally well-liked she is that she can record a new theme song for the NFL, one of 2018's most controversial institutions, and get criticized by football fans not for her politics, but for its less-than-catchy lyrics.
    More: NFL fans hated Carrie Underwood's new 'Sunday Night Football' theme song
    At a time when there are few remaining neutral parties in American society, Underwood is increasingly becoming an anomaly -- liked by country fans and still marketable as a pop star and palatable to fans from all political persuasions. That's why she's able to record a title track about ugly authenticity, and yet maintain an almost-entirely airbrushed public persona and still come off as relatable. All these years after her 2005 "American Idol" win -- even in these much more divisive times -- she is one of the closest things we have to an official America's sweetheart.


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  • #23
    Ultimate Carrie Fan Smokyiiis's Avatar
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    New albums: Carrie Underwood, Good Charlotte | Entertainment | fltimes.com

    CARRIE UNDERWOOD
    "Cry Pretty"
    BOTTOM LINE: Taking control to deliver her first world-class artistic effort.
    Carrie Underwood has always been a great singer, from the moment we met the Checotah, Oklahoma, native on "American Idol" in 2005.
    But she hasn't always had great songs to sing. For every "Jesus, Take the Wheel" or "So Small" on her albums, there was plenty of pleasant country filler. But not on "Cry Pretty" (Capitol Music Nashville).
    Start to finish, Underwood's sixth album is easily her best, filled with songs that make the most of her voice, both physical and lyrical. The title track may be more poignant following Underwood's fall last year that resulted in 50 stitches in her face and an uncomfortable focus on how she looks. But when she belts out the song's final third, she is undeniable.
    Maybe the biggest surprise on "Cry Pretty" are the numerous risks Underwood takes that all pay off. Musically, she offers her poppiest song in years with "That Song That We Used to Make Love To," which leans more toward Aaliyah-era R&B instead of anything currently on country radio. Lyrically, Underwood takes on issues that she has previously sidestepped.
    "The Bullet" is a wrenching ballad about those left behind by violence that Underwood included in part because of the shooting deaths at the Route 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas. "You can blame it on hate or blame it on guns," she sings with increasing intensity. "But mamas ain't supposed to bury their sons."
    On "Love Wins," one of the nine songs she co-wrote on the album, Underwood creates a soaring anthem of inclusion after pointing out pitfalls like "politics and prejudice."
    Of course, Underwood shines brightest with a string of future country smashes, including the celebration of classic country heroes on "Ghosts on the Stereo" and her fiery defense of home life on "Kingdom."
    "Cry Pretty" finds Underwood at the peak of her powers and she's determined to use them for good.


    Awesome review

  • #24
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    We know it’s a great album and by far her best work. I measure reveiws from that baseline. And most of the negative reviews are formulamatic bombast that they break out for Carrie no matter what the Album or song... It’s boring and not worthy of reading.. And besides Willie gets them some really good SH*T...

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    Ringer Review and ACM Cry Pretty Performance

    This review has the ACM performance embedded, such a great watch again!
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  • #26
    Huge Carrie Follower lilangel's Avatar
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    yeah first I was a little defensive like did I hear the same music?? I know I only heard the snippets but come on they're darn good. So more mature, so more clearer etc etc.

    Maybe I'm a little biased as a fan but I will tell if I don't like something (and that happend occassionally) and also tell it's okay to not like everything that Carrie does. She is a Human, she has her own personal tastes that can differ from mine.

    So I when I read the first negative reviews I was getting in the defensive mode. Ofcourse. Who wouldn't!

    Couple of hours later...
    I'm now okay with the reviews listed above. Like I said everyone it titled to their own opinion. And I guess there will always be some people that she can't please no matter What she does. Read a recent interview where she said that she is at a state in her live that she is fine with that. She will do things that please her as a person not What the masses want. You go girl! That's what we want. Just be you! Let we all keep that in mind.

    Some things happen in life, happen for a reason. Sometimes it takes time to see what the reason was/is. Carrie sounds so more confident and mature in her recent interviews. She grew as a person. And with this album she grew as an artist.

    The 2 main things the negative reviews as for now point out are:

    1. They didn't like it because they find the album not that personal. I'm okay with that. I like Carrie for the fact that she despite the limelight she has her own life. That's her most important thing in life, her family. A dedication she should be proud. We know the 'personal' aspect is on a different kinds of levels. Some autobiographical. Some on vocal point. Some on the producing point. I don't need to know all love times or the fights with Mike. I'm okay with the way she does it. Subtle, not on your face. For all we know SB, TB, Low, DA etc all could autobiographical. Maybe not all recent but alone the way in life.

    Second they don't like she isn't taking a stand point in LW and TB. Well they all should listen to LW again. She literally says 'doesn't mind if you're wrong or right'. They are already a lot of celebs who are really vocal. I appreciate Carrie for staying in the middle as it comes to her own standpoints. Like she gives us space to make up our own minds and not pressure her own. But give us some morals to think about and never forget.

    Hope the positive ones are yet to come! She deserves them!

  • #27
    Insane Carrie Fan CarrieAddicted's Avatar
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    I think this review is kinda fair.

    As much as this is her "most personal" album, Carrie is a woman that won't say much about her personal life, and I applaud her for that. So, when she announced Cry Pretty to the world by saying "this is my most personal album", I assume almost everyone (critics included) was expecting her to now be an open book, and that didn't happen.

    So, yes, when TIME says "you’re left with little sense of the woman behind these songs. Cry Pretty might boast a new coat of paint, but it ultimately suggests that Underwood has recovered her footing by returning to what feels comfortable", I agree, even though I haven't listened to the album.
    Which means, she experimented this new side of personal lyrics ("new coat of paint"), but still remained herself ("returning to what feels comfortable"): a shy woman.

    I'm curious to know what score TIME gave the album.
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  • #28
    Insane Carrie Fan CarrieAddicted's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOPDOG1001 View Post
    This "review" is the most pathetic review ever!

    This guy reviewed TWO albums together, by comparing them. And sounded SO biased. Sounded like a Willie Nelson stan.

    So uprofessional.

  • #29
    Insane Carrie Fan twaintrain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOPDOG1001 View Post
    “Ghosts on the Stereo” is trying to be Coldplay? What song did they listen to because it obviously wasn’t GOTS.

    I get so tired of critics that think because a song is radio-friendly and a lot of people will like it, it must not be good.

  • #30
    Carrie Fans Legend teesharky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarrieAddicted View Post
    This "review" is the most pathetic review ever!

    This guy reviewed TWO albums together, by comparing them. And sounded SO biased. Sounded like a Willie Nelson stan.

    So uprofessional.
    Agree just a hater and fake news. Not even a real
    review.
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  • #31
    Junior Carrie Follower kiwigirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOPDOG1001 View Post
    "But nowhere I’ve seen, including in the carefully equivocating “The Bullet,” does she take a decipherable stance on the issue of guns. And that simply doesn’t jibe with a real-life parental mind-set (of whatever political persuasion) — one of several red flags on an album, “Cry Pretty,” that Underwood’s team is explicitly framing as her most personal"

    She has already said the song is apolitical and not going to pick sides but instead touch on the fact that a bullet does more than just kill someone, it destroy's so many lives. I'm not sure why he would think Carrie would ever get that kind of political, it's not a news flash that she keeps politics out of her music and I think that's smart of her.

    And personal doesn't always mean you've written true life-this happened to me-it was so personal songs, it could mean personal because she's put more effort and more heart and soul into it. She's produced it and added her flare to the production of the songs and way she sings them aka a more personal touch. Also I do think some songs are very personal to her and there are def songs she can relate to on a personal level. We don't know what she's been through personally, drinking alone could be personal to her, there may have been a time in a bar she kissed a guy to get over a broken heart, we don't know. I think what he and others expected was deep personal life story songs like Taylor Swift and that's not what they got. But that doesn't mean it's not personal.

    "The effect is of a gifted strategist trying to cover all her bases, never less so than in “Ghosts on the Stereo,” which sounds like it wants to be a Coldplay song even as Underwood insists that she’s happiest all alone listening to “Hank, Haggard and Jones.” You’ll notice that one country legend she doesn’t mention there is Willie Nelson"

    I notice he made the reference then didn't offer up a comparison so people could understand it, I can only think he's touching on the ohohoh parts after the chorus, but that's not unique to Coldplay. So she didn't mention Willie Nelson, she didn't mention a lot of country artist I'm sure she listens to - who cares??

    "just as depersonalizing as Underwood’s determination not to offend anyone"

    And what's wrong with not wanting to offend people? How is not being offensive depersonalizing? To imply Carrie had no human characteristics or individuality on this record is simply untrue. She was full of human emotion like love, kindness, compassion, empathy, hope and faith. To me he implies that to be personal you have to offend people and get political, yeah dude that so aint true.



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  • #32
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    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/p...etty-5hq905nj3

    Carrie Underwood stays true to pop-country convention on Cry Pretty

    ★★★☆☆
    You don’t get more country than Carrie Underwood, right. While contemporaries such as Kacey Musgraves and Taylor Swift have played around with the Nashville formula or abandoned it, Underwood stays true to pop-country convention.

    She’s also very good at it. The title track is an emotionally wrought belter to give Dolly Parton a run for her money, and the metaphors of misery filling the lighters-aloft anthem Low (“Like a cigarette without a light,” etc) suit the pain in Underwood’s voice.

    There’s an anti-gun song, The Bullet, a brave move in the firearms-loving world of country, and Drinking Alone is a soulful lament about heartbreak that waves the flag for drowning your sorrows in booze, but otherwise this is resolutely traditional: smooth, straight talking and ultra-professional. (Capitol Nashville)
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  • #33
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    Another negative review.

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/20...soupcon-of-sad

    Six albums into her career, Carrie Underwood sometimes seems more like a weaponised expression of modern country’s commercial power than a singer. Even the promotional bumf from her label spends more time dwelling on statistics – albums sold, awards won, streams amassed – than on her music. Mind you, that’s probably wise: Cry Pretty is precisely as interesting as the malls and insanely programmed radio stations where it will be played to death. Cry Pretty’s big “statement” is The Bullet, a song Underwood has apparently been considering for inclusion on several albums, using it this time in response to the Las Vegas mass shooting of last year.

    The build-up leads you to expect a lacerating critique of US gun culture; what you get is a lachrymose exposition of the misery of families who lose a loved one to shooting. “You can blame it on hate or blame it on guns,” Underwood sings, in a “who really knows how people end up dead with bullets in them?” sort of way. Ghosts on the Stereo – with namechecks for “Hank, Haggard and Jones” – is the obligatory nod to forebears whose family connection is now very remote indeed. Cry Pretty is an album of power ballads and – on Drinking Alone and End Up With You – nods to pop R&B. It’s not horrible, but it feels very much like something that could have been produced without any human involvement; it is all gloss and shine, with sadness at industry-approved levels of maximum efficacy. Take 75% uplift, add 20% melancholy, top up with 5% not actually contentious controversy, and voilà: Cry Pretty. 2/5

    *score counts in metacritic

  • #34
    Carrie Guru Claire2004's Avatar
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    ^The reviews are making me sad....

  • #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Claire2004 View Post
    ^The reviews are making me sad....
    I wouldn't let them make me feel sad. The only time I read reviews is when Carrie releases a new album. So I don't let a reviewer sway whether I'm going to buy something or not. And well over half of these reviews, I've never even heard of or read their publications before.

    I just chalk it up to them not knowing good music when they hear it. And the best way to counteract a bad review is to buy buy buy and spread the word that the album is really really really good. Spread the word to family, friends and strangers -- its a really good album and they should buy it!!!!


  • #36
    Carrie Guru thaifood's Avatar
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    Back in the day the critics absolutely hated Grand Funk, Black Sabbath & even Led Zeppelin, but that didn't stop them from becoming rock icons & selling gazillions of records & putting thousands of fannys in the seats for their concert tours. I remember distinctly reading a review of a LZ album in Rolling Stone where the reviewer said something along the lines that the band wasn't very good but they had one of the best FEMALE rock singers out there. Poor Robert Plant, he was not then & still isn't now a female, but he is a great vocalist.

    These types of reviews should have been expected. Afterall, the name music CRITIC has to be lived up to.
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  • #37
    Carrie Guru Claire2004's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaisyTweets View Post
    I wouldn't let them make me feel sad. The only time I read reviews is when Carrie releases a new album. So I don't let a reviewer sway whether I'm going to buy something or not. And well over half of these reviews, I've never even heard of or read their publications before.

    I just chalk it up to them not knowing good music when they hear it. And the best way to counteract a bad review is to buy buy buy and spread the word that the album is really really really good. Spread the word to family, friends and strangers -- its a really good album and they should buy it!!!!


    Thanks. It’s just that, I notice Carrie gets emotional when she talks about this album, so this means a lot to her. I hate that this project that meant a lot to her gets dismissed so casually by these critics.

    Honestly, I don’t know how artists do it, I don’t know how they put their heart and soul out there with their art only to get their work ripped apart by the critics. I don’t think I can do it (Plus I don’t have an artistic bone in my body anyway lol).
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  • #38
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    I think Carrie is more concerned if her fans will like it. and if maybe she can garner a few more fans.

  • #39
    Obsessed Carrie Fan jaks_weyn's Avatar
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    So long the album and the singles do great, the reviews won't mean anything.. Good reviews are nice and gets us excited, but at the end of the day, it's all about impact.. even if the album gets 100% in metacritic, if it doesn't do anything to people, that album will just be pure artistry but no heart... and I dunno.. critics have their own expectations and criteria that are sometimes disconnected with the general public..

    Carrie won't satisfy them and I don't think she needs to... Like she said, she wants to share music with meaning and those people can enjoy... That's why I want her songs to be big and known to more people especially with this album that is special to her.. that has more impact and the more impact she has, the more people she can reach and touch..
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  • #40
    Ultimate Carrie Fan TOPDOG1001's Avatar
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    I’m surprised by the recent negative reviews. I really thought this would be critically acclaimed. Oh well. I know she has a thick skin, so she’ll be fine.
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