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Thread: Carrie Underwood’s “Something In The Water” Becomes Bro-Country’s Coffin Nail

  1. #1
    Insane Carrie Fan lizcarlo's Avatar
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    Carrie Underwood’s “Something In The Water” Becomes Bro-Country’s Coffin Nail

    Carrie Underwood?s ?Something In The Water? Becomes Bro-Country?s Coffin Nail « Saving Country Music
    Keep reading it because after he complains about Something Bad he gives Something In The Water a nice complement.



    It was May of 2014, and Bro-Country was at the apex of its hold on mainstream country music. Florida Georgia Line and Luke Bryan constituted a monopoly at the top of the country charts, and the women of mainstream country were virtually nowhere to be found. The only three female artists who’d been able to mount any sort of charge against the mainstream country patriarchy over the last few years had been Taylor Swift, Carrie Underwood, and Miranda Lambert. But Taylor Swift was nearly two years into her album release cycle with no new singles to speak of, and behind the scenes was readying her shift to pop. Carrie Underwood was in a similar boat, with her last album released in 2012, and the final single released in April of 2013. So it was up to Miranda Lambert to see if she could disrupt the sausage fest at the top of the country charts, and she had a plan.

    With Carrie Underwood not promoting any current singles that could be seen as competition, Miranda reached out to Carrie to see if she would be interested in a collaboration. The idea was to put these two female country music superstars on the same song and combine fan bases to create a super song to puncture the Bro-Country blockade. I’m a big fan of hers, and asking her to do this was nerve-racking,” Miranda said to Associated Press at the time. “I sent her an email, this long, blobbing email about if she wanted to sing on the record, it could be cool, but maybe she didn’t want to, if she liked the song, but she didn’t have to like the song. When I sent it I thought, ‘This sounds ridiculous.’”

    Carrie-Underwood-Miranda-Lambert-Somethin-BadBut Carrie Underwood accepted, and the collaborative single “Somethin’ Bad” came into being. Think of it: The two biggest female names in country joining forces. It was a powerful idea. As Saving Country Music said at the time, “Despite what the duo may or may not say or allude to publicly, ‘Somethin Bad’ has one primary purpose: to break through Bro-Country’s stranglehold on country music. The Bro-Country phenomenon has lasted for too long, and the pairing of country music’s two top females may be the only way to break the Bro-Country monopoly. ‘Something Bad’ is the symbolic, ‘We are the women of country, hear us roar!’ statement.”

    Miranda said about the song before anyone had even heard it, “We’re coming together as a force … If you’re sitting on the front row, you might want to scoot back. It’s a force, you know what I mean? It just feels exciting to me … It’s been too long since two girls in our genre have come together like that.”

    The setting was the Billboard Music Awards where the song and collaboration would debut on May 18th in a live performance. Earlier in the day at rehearsals, Carrie Underwood and Miranda Lambert were photographed wearing matching Thelma & Louise T-shirts. Country music was frothing with anticipation at what the collaboration might entail, and the rhetoric preceding its unveiling was all about how how “ass kicking” the collaboration would be.

    Then when it was time for Miranda and Carrie to take the Billboard Music Awards stage and share “Somethin’ Bad” with the world, some were bobbing their heads along, but some were shocked at the smeared mascara shout fest unfolding before them. “Somethin’ Bad” wasn’t Carrie and Miranda battling Bro-Country by offering something better, it was attempting to battle it by stooping down to Bro-Country’s level. The usually congenial fan bases of both Carrie and Miranda supporters were curiously unfavorable of the song, but it showed itself to be fairly commercially formidable in the end, knocking off Luke Bryan’s “Play It Again” at the #1 spot on Billboard’s Hot Country Songs chart on July 12th, 2014.

    But it’s reign at #1 was fairly short lived, and the “If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em” attitude of “Somethin’ Bad” meant the success of the song was a shallow victory. As Saving Country Music said in its review of the song, “In lieu of the duo battling bro-country with the brawn of their sheer star talent and doing what they do best, which is wowing audiences with singing prowess and powerful lyricism, Carrie and Miranda stole plays straight out of the Bro-Country coloring book and descended into vapid and story-less rhythmic superfluousness complete with unnecessary gesticulations and other showy nonsense that illustrated how amateurish and under-practiced they are at being really bad.”

    “Somethin’ Bad” had been made under the false pretense that to defeat Bro-Country, you had to beat the bros at their own game, when in truth the better solution would have been to offer something completely different—something with substance, that showcased female country talent, and that carried some ties to country music’s past. And it still had to be something from one of country music’s leading females since they had already established that the country radio oligarchy would play them. Maddie & Tae’s “Girl In A Country Song” was a step better in the right direction, but still was saddled by relying too much on Bro-Country’s own modes to separate itself from the trend and become a song for the ages.

    And then Carrie Underwood released “Something In The Water.”

    carrie-underwood-something-in-the-waterThis song was unexpected in so many ways. First, Carrie Underwood, who’d revealed a month before that she was pregnant, was getting ready to release a new album, but it was a Greatest Hits compilation. That didn’t necessarily guarantee there would be a brand new, high caliber single that her label could get behind and make a serious contender for the top of the charts. It’s rare the new songs on a Greatest Hits release become the biggest singles of a singer’s career, or even one of their signature songs. Then there was the heavily religious quotient to the song that could turn some listeners and radio programmers off. How would such a non-secular song fare in this type of Bro-Country environment? Oh, and lets not forget Carrie Underwood is female, which holds its own disadvantages these days, top tier talent or not.

    But what “Something In The Water” had that no other song that could offer battle to Bro-Country had previously was substance, and one of the most powerful performances we’ve heard from a country artist in the last few years. This is what was needed to defeat Bro-Country. It wasn’t going to take pandering. Leadership is what was needed, and an exhibition of raw talent that could not be denied. This was the alternative that would erode the appeal to Bro-Country, would make people realize just how shallow this trend had become, and just how appealing a powerful voice and message can be compared to catchy rhythms and lazy lyrics.

    As Saving Country Music said in the review of “Something In The Water” when it was released in late September of 2014, “…it will be jeered as pure pop by many, but even with this assessment it still puts it in front of the garbled, directionless multi-genre hodgepodge presented by many of the genre’s top male stars. This is the true ‘anti Bro-Country’ salvo country music has been lacking—one that doesn’t write its plan as the exact opposite of the scribblings in Bro-Country’s playbook, but one that blows the entire argument out of the water. Call it pop if you want, but the delineation the song truly strives for is ‘timeless.’

    And what has happened subsequently? Four months later, and “Something In The Water” is not only still going strong, it has become the biggest charting single on Billboard’s Hot Country Songs chart of Carrie Underwood’s entire career, and counting. “Something In The Water” has now been atop the Billboard chart for seven straight weeks—a feat for a woman that has only been bested in the history of the chart by Taylor Swift’s “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together” which sat at #1 for ten weeks in 2012/2013, and Hall of Famer Connie Smith’s “Once a Day” which was a #1 for eight weeks spanning 1964-1965. “Something In The Water” is on its way to becoming ‘timeless’ indeed, and in doing so, it is driving a nail in the coffin of Bro-Country, which was already in the process of faltering.

    READ: R.I.P. “Bro-Country” (2011-2014)

    Is “Something In The Water” ideal for traditionally-oriented country fans looking for a return to genre’s glory days? No, no it’s not. But it is a step in the right direction for instilling both women and substance back atop the country music genre once again. It’s also fair to point out that just like the pop songs of Taylor Swift, which benefited under Billboard’s new chart rules, the reign of “Something In The Water” has benefited from heavy play and appeal to the Christian music market. But one of the great things about “Something In The Water” is the power of the performance and song transcends traditional religious biases, just like “Amazing Grace” does, which contributes its legacy to the song, and also gives it a traditional country element.

    Let’s not start hanging “Mission Accomplished” banners just yet though. “Something In The Water” has still been fighting an uphill battle on country radio, and is still not receiving the type of airplay of similar blockbuster singles. As Windmills Country adeptly points out in a data-driven piece, women are still receiving disproportionate support on country radio. When regarding the recent chart successes of Carrie Underwood and Maddie & Tae’s “Girl In A Country Song,” it does appear that we are witnessing a change of the tide. But Bro-Country assuredly has some last whimpers to sound, and invariably something else, potentially more sinister may crop up in its place, just like how Bro-Country in some ways replaced the mainstream presence of country rap. Jason Aldean’s wildly-successful single “Burnin’ It Down,” and the uncanny rise of Sam Hunt signal this burgeoning trend of R&B and EDM-infused songs that really have no measure of country in them becoming the next big offense by country music’s male performers.

    But as long as we learn the lessons from the success of “Something In The Water” to not chase trends, but to fend them off with substance and leadership, then at least a semblance of balance in the genre could prevail and propel the genre forward with music that is sustainable, unsusceptible to the volatility of trends, and at least tries to offer some variety and balance when it comes to gender and quality.

    Bro-country may be dead or on its last legs, but unless country music learns its lessons and makes wise assessments in the aftermath of a hyper-trend that sullied the reputation of country music across American culture, it is destined to happen again.

  • #2
    Junior Carrie Follower northtexas's Avatar
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    Carrie Underwood’s “Something In The Water” Becomes Bro-Country’s Coffin Nail

    Carrie Underwood’s “Something In The Water” Becomes Bro-Country’s Coffin Nail

    Carrie Underwood?s ?Something In The Water? Becomes Bro-Country?s Coffin Nail « Saving Country Music
    January 26, 2015 - By Trigger
    It was May of 2014, and Bro-Country was at the apex of its hold on mainstream country music. Florida Georgia Line and Luke Bryan constituted a monopoly at the top of the country charts, and the women of mainstream country were virtually nowhere to be found. The only three female artists who’d been able to mount any sort of charge against the mainstream country patriarchy over the last few years had been Taylor Swift, Carrie Underwood, and Miranda Lambert. But Taylor Swift was nearly two years into her album release cycle with no new singles to speak of, and behind the scenes was readying her shift to pop. Carrie Underwood was in a similar boat, with her last album released in 2012, and the final single released in April of 2013. So it was up to Miranda Lambert to see if she could disrupt the sausage fest at the top of the country charts, and she had a plan.
    With Carrie Underwood not promoting any current singles that could be seen as competition, Miranda reached out to Carrie to see if she would be interested in a collaboration. The idea was to put these two female country music superstars on the same song and combine fan bases to create a super song to puncture the Bro-Country blockade. I’m a big fan of hers, and asking her to do this was nerve-racking,” Miranda said to Associated Press at the time. “I sent her an email, this long, blobbing email about if she wanted to sing on the record, it could be cool, but maybe she didn’t want to, if she liked the song, but she didn’t have to like the song. When I sent it I thought, ‘This sounds ridiculous.’”
    But Carrie Underwood accepted, and the collaborative single “Somethin’ Bad” came into being. Think of it: The two biggest female names in country joining forces. It was a powerful idea. As Saving Country Music said at the time, “Despite what the duo may or may not say or allude to publicly, ‘Somethin Bad’ has one primary purpose: to break through Bro-Country’s stranglehold on country music. The Bro-Country phenomenon has lasted for too long, and the pairing of country music’s two top females may be the only way to break the Bro-Country monopoly. ‘Something Bad’ is the symbolic, ‘We are the women of country, hear us roar!’ statement.”
    Miranda said about the song before anyone had even heard it, “We’re coming together as a force … If you’re sitting on the front row, you might want to scoot back. It’s a force, you know what I mean? It just feels exciting to me … It’s been too long since two girls in our genre have come together like that.”
    The setting was the Billboard Music Awards where the song and collaboration would debut on May 18th in a live performance. Earlier in the day at rehearsals, Carrie Underwood and Miranda Lambert were photographed wearing matching Thelma & Louise T-shirts. Country music was frothing with anticipation at what the collaboration might entail, and the rhetoric preceding its unveiling was all about how how “ass kicking” the collaboration would be.
    Then when it was time for Miranda and Carrie to take the Billboard Music Awards stage and share “Somethin’ Bad” with the world, some were bobbing their heads along, but some were shocked at the smeared mascara shout fest unfolding before them. “Somethin’ Bad” wasn’t Carrie and Miranda battling Bro-Country by offering something better, it was attempting to battle it by stooping down to Bro-Country’s level. The usually congenial fan bases of both Carrie and Miranda supporters were curiously unfavorable of the song, but it showed itself to be fairly commercially formidable in the end, knocking off Luke Bryan’s “Play It Again” at the #1 spot on Billboard’s Hot Country Songs chart on July 12th, 2014.
    But it’s reign at #1 was fairly short lived, and the “If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em” attitude of “Somethin’ Bad” meant the success of the song was a shallow victory. As Saving Country Music said in its review of the song, “In lieu of the duo battling bro-country with the brawn of their sheer star talent and doing what they do best, which is wowing audiences with singing prowess and powerful lyricism, Carrie and Miranda stole plays straight out of the Bro-Country coloring book and descended into vapid and story-less rhythmic superfluousness complete with unnecessary gesticulations and other showy nonsense that illustrated how amateurish and under-practiced they are at being really bad.”
    “Somethin’ Bad” had been made under the false pretense that to defeat Bro-Country, you had to beat the bros at their own game, when in truth the better solution would have been to offer something completely different—something with substance, that showcased female country talent, and that carried some ties to country music’s past. And it still had to be something from one of country music’s leading females since they had already established that the country radio oligarchy would play them. Maddie & Tae’s “Girl In A Country Song” was a step better in the right direction, but still was saddled by relying too much on Bro-Country’s own modes to separate itself from the trend and become a song for the ages.
    And then Carrie Underwood released “Something In The Water.”
    This song was unexpected in so many ways. First, Carrie Underwood, who’d revealed a month before that she was pregnant, was getting ready to release a new album, but it was a Greatest Hits compilation. That didn’t necessarily guarantee there would be a brand new, high caliber single that her label could get behind and make a serious contender for the top of the charts. It’s rare the new songs on a Greatest Hits release become the biggest singles of a singer’s career, or even one of their signature songs. Then there was the heavily religious quotient to the song that could turn some listeners and radio programmers off. How would such a non-secular song fare in this type of Bro-Country environment? Oh, and lets not forget Carrie Underwood is female, which holds its own disadvantages these days, top tier talent or not.
    But what “Something In The Water” had that no other song that could offer battle to Bro-Country had previously was substance, and one of the most powerful performances we’ve heard from a country artist in the last few years. This is what was needed to defeat Bro-Country. It wasn’t going to take pandering. Leadership is what was needed, and an exhibition of raw talent that could not be denied. This was the alternative that would erode the appeal to Bro-Country, would make people realize just how shallow this trend had become, and just how appealing a powerful voice and message can be compared to catchy rhythms and lazy lyrics.
    As Saving Country Music said in the review of “Something In The Water” when it was released in late September of 2014, “…it will be jeered as pure pop by many, but even with this assessment it still puts it in front of the garbled, directionless multi-genre hodgepodge presented by many of the genre’s top male stars. This is the true ‘anti Bro-Country’ salvo country music has been lacking—one that doesn’t write its plan as the exact opposite of the scribblings in Bro-Country’s playbook, but one that blows the entire argument out of the water. Call it pop if you want, but the delineation the song truly strives for is ‘timeless.’
    And what has happened subsequently? Four months later, and “Something In The Water” is not only still going strong, it has become the biggest charting single on Billboard’s Hot Country Songs chart of Carrie Underwood’s entire career, and counting. “Something In The Water” has now been atop the Billboard chart for seven straight weeks—a feat for a woman that has only been bested in the history of the chart by Taylor Swift’s “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together” which sat at #1 for ten weeks in 2012/2013, and Hall of Famer Connie Smith’s “Once a Day” which was a #1 for eight weeks spanning 1964-1965. “Something In The Water” is on its way to becoming ‘timeless’ indeed, and in doing so, it is driving a nail in the coffin of Bro-Country, which was already in the process of faltering.
    Is “Something In The Water” ideal for traditionally-oriented country fans looking for a return to genre’s glory days? No, no it’s not. But it is a step in the right direction for instilling both women and substance back atop the country music genre once again. It’s also fair to point out that just like the pop songs of Taylor Swift, which benefited under Billboard’s new chart rules, the reign of “Something In The Water” has benefited from heavy play and appeal to the Christian music market. But one of the great things about “Something In The Water” is the power of the performance and song transcends traditional religious biases, just like “Amazing Grace” does, which contributes its legacy to the song, and also gives it a traditional country element.
    Let’s not start hanging “Mission Accomplished” banners just yet though. “Something In The Water” has still been fighting an uphill battle on country radio, and is still not receiving the type of airplay of similar blockbuster singles. As Windmills Country adeptly points out in a data-driven piece, women are still receiving disproportionate support on country radio. When regarding the recent chart successes of Carrie Underwood and Maddie & Tae’s “Girl In A Country Song,” it does appear that we are witnessing a change of the tide. But Bro-Country assuredly has some last whimpers to sound, and invariably something else, potentially more sinister may crop up in its place, just like how Bro-Country in some ways replaced the mainstream presence of country rap. Jason Aldean’s wildly-successful single “Burnin’ It Down,” and the uncanny rise of Sam Hunt signal this burgeoning trend of R&B and EDM-infused songs that really have no measure of country in them becoming the next big offense by country music’s male performers.
    But as long as we learn the lessons from the success of “Something In The Water” to not chase trends, but to fend them off with substance and leadership, then at least a semblance of balance in the genre could prevail and propel the genre forward with music that is sustainable, unsusceptible to the volatility of trends, and at least tries to offer some variety and balance when it comes to gender and quality.
    Bro-country may be dead or on its last legs, but unless country music learns its lessons and makes wise assessments in the aftermath of a hyper-trend that sullied the reputation of country music across American culture, it is destined to happen again.
    bluetb4, lizcarlo, oldyfan and 7 others like this.

  • #3
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    I really liked this article. I do wonder what is coming next for country music. I think Luke Bryan sees the writing on the wall. This year will be his last Spring Break EP and we know there will most likely be a new album from him this fall. I would love for Luke to lead the charge in the males turning away from bro-country since he kind of got it started with Country Girl (Shake it for Me). Luke has had some really good songs in the past like "Do I", "Rain is a Good Thing", and Someone Else Calling You Baby" Jason Aldean has had some good songs in the past too, although I have to admit that I do like Burnin It Down. I have always been a fan of R&B music, though, and BID is very much R&B to me. I like the song, but I don't think every male in country needs to follow suit with the EDM and R&B flavor. It is going to be interesting to see what comes next for country music, although it will always be a male dominated genre. It would be nice, though, to see the glory days of the 90s for females again.

  • #4
    Ultimate Carrie Fan Smokyiiis's Avatar
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    Excellent article....thanks for the find!
    northtexas likes this.

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    Obsessed Carrie Fan terilyn's Avatar
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    Great article good read. Thanks for posting.

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    Great article! Thank you!!!

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    Ultimate Carrie Fan jptexas's Avatar
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    I'm thinking country program mangers have seen this article and either woke up or are about dig their heels even deeper in what they think is working for them. But we're going to see more articles like this one if they continue to not include enough women artists in their programs and continue to highlight all these bro country songs that basically all say the same damn thing. I just hope they don't blame that darn Underwood girl, "who does she think she is anyway". I'm hoping and praying that Carrie wins the Grammy for SITW. Now THAT might put the nail in the bro country coffin. All the music industry votes after all the genre nominations have been decided, so the bro country crowd just might get a ,"hey, get your act together", vote that slaps them across their face.
    rainbow1, bluetb4, oldyfan and 1 others like this.

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    ^ she's a woman of substance : )

    and we wouldn't have it any other way. can you imagine if Carrie sang nothing but UI type songs?
    We would get bored and so would she. Aren't these men bored of singing the same song for 2 hours in concert every night?
    oldyfan, bluetb4 and rainbow1 like this.

  • #9
    Ultimate Carrie Fan jptexas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maddkat View Post
    ^ she's a woman of substance : )

    and we wouldn't have it any other way. can you imagine if Carrie sang nothing but UI type songs?
    We would get bored and so would she. Aren't these men bored of singing the same song for 2 hours in concert every night?
    As long as they continue to be rewarded with number one songs, they'll continue to sing them, boring or not.
    "Now, here's my other number one song. It might sound just like the one you just heard, but country radio just loves them". "One, two, three, four------".
    rainbow1, oldyfan and bluetb4 like this.

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    Great article. Love this part.

    But what “Something In The Water” had that no other song that could offer battle to Bro-Country had previously was substance, and one of the most powerful performances we’ve heard from a country artist in the last few years. This is what was needed to defeat Bro-Country. It wasn’t going to take pandering. Leadership is what was needed, and an exhibition of raw talent that could not be denied. This was the alternative that would erode the appeal to Bro-Country, would make people realize just how shallow this trend had become, and just how appealing a powerful voice and message can be compared to catchy rhythms and lazy lyrics.

  • #11
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    It is so refreshing seeing such positive remarks about Carrie and SITW....kinda brought a tear to my eye!!
    Hope they write another one, in more detail, about how SITW was manipulated and robbed of the #1 position.
    oldyfan and rainbow1 like this.

  • #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by maddkat View Post
    ^ she's a woman of substance : )

    and we wouldn't have it any other way. can you imagine if Carrie sang nothing but UI type songs?
    We would get bored and so would she. Aren't these men bored of singing the same song for 2 hours in concert every night?
    It is isn't just radio, it is the concert-going audience that loves them as well. I guess maybe I tolerate bro-country a little better than some, because when I get tired of country, I just listen to another genre. Sometimes I'm in the mood for dirt-road party songs and sometimes I'm not. When I am, I love listening to Luke and Jason Aldean, Kip Moore and a few of the others (still don't care for FGL, though). When I'm not, I just go listen to Hot AC or throw in a CD like Hozier or Vance Joy or Sarah McClachlan or Carrie or TS. There is very little music that I don't like, so I just get my variety elsewhere and leave country radio for those that want the party songs. Then when I'm in the mood for it, I go back to country radio. I think that country is really targeting that younger demographic that likes to party and drink so the music just kind of goes along with that audience. Also, country acts that are filling arenas and stadiums want party music to keep the audience happy that are there to drink (sometimes too much as I experienced at the Miranda concert) and party. Even Carrie, in my opinion, falls prey to trying to have more uptempo songs in her set list for concerts, when I would be happy listening to her sing love songs all day, lol. So, I can go to a Luke or Miranda concert one month and then two months later go see Sarah McLachlan to get a whole different experience. I don't expect an artist to conform to what I want - I just go find someone else that does put out what I want to listen to that day.

    Disclaimer: I do want Carrie to put out more love songs just because she is so good at them when she does them and I love love songs. Since Carrie isn't a mushy love person, I listen to Taylor Swift to get my love song fix, lol. Or David Nail. So, for an artist that is my favorite like Carrie, yes, I sometimes have things that I wish she would do differently, because she is my favorite and I guess I would like to listen to Carrie 24/7, but she doesn't necessarily have music for my every mood so I have to look elsewhere. With other artists, I don't really "expect" or hope them to change because I'm not invested, so if I don't like it, I just listen to something else. In other words, I guess I'm saying maybe if people don't like what country radio plays they need to find another outlet for music (and many here have done just that). It can be hard to be a Carrie fan when she has chosen country music and doesn't get the recognition she deserves in the genre sometimes, but she seems to be happy there so it isn't going to change any time soon.
    oldyfan and Audra like this.

  • #13
    Ultimate Carrie Fan Farawayhills's Avatar
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    For anyone interested, this song is the classic source of the Triggerman's "nail in the coffin" title.



    That is a modern version (2014), performed in a Bluegrass style. The song, though, was originally by Ernest Tubb, and sung by him in a punchy honky-tonk style. In SITW, Carrie herself retains more of the original influence, as she sings the verse sections, particularly the early narration of the troubled state in a style recalling honky-tonk phrasing. This is one of several examples in SITW where Carrie's song incorporates classic Country echoes and references.

    I applaud Trig's recognition of the importance of SITW as an outstanding alternative to the standard "hit" fare on Mainstream radio - but at the same time, I think caution is needed in thinking it will consign the general preponderance of unchallenging good-time songs to the coffin.

    A comment about radio's attitude towards Carrie, made by one of the site's visitors also caught my eye:

    "Overall, I feel like Underwood is an artist who always has been allowed to be an outlier. She was allowed to still be a mega star even during the bro reign when no other females could get played on radio. She was allowed to cover Randy Travis when country was going in an even more pop/rock direction. She was allowed to make a hit out of See You Again even though that type of song went out of style on country radio 7 years prior. This is just another case where she gets to be an outlier, not a trendsetter. Radio will play her but they won’t play other artists that follow her lead. So, in my prediction, not much will change because of this single."

    You may, or may not agree with that verdict - but I think it contains more than a grain of truth.
    hjj, rainbow1 and Kizmet311 like this.

  • #14
    Ultimate Carrie Fan jptexas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Farawayhills View Post
    For anyone interested, this song is the classic source of the Triggerman's "nail in the coffin" title.



    That is a modern version (2014), performed in a Bluegrass style. The song, though, was originally by Ernest Tubb, and sung by him in a punchy honky-tonk style. In SITW, Carrie herself retains more of the original influence, as she sings the verse sections, particularly the early narration of the troubled state in a style recalling honky-tonk phrasing. This is one of several examples in SITW where Carrie's song incorporates classic Country echoes and references.

    I applaud Trig's recognition of the importance of SITW as an outstanding alternative to the standard "hit" fare on Mainstream radio - but at the same time, I think caution is needed in thinking it will consign the general preponderance of unchallenging good-time songs to the coffin.

    A comment about radio's attitude towards Carrie, made by one of the site's visitors also caught my eye:

    "Overall, I feel like Underwood is an artist who always has been allowed to be an outlier. She was allowed to still be a mega star even during the bro reign when no other females could get played on radio. She was allowed to cover Randy Travis when country was going in an even more pop/rock direction. She was allowed to make a hit out of See You Again even though that type of song went out of style on country radio 7 years prior. This is just another case where she gets to be an outlier, not a trendsetter. Radio will play her but they won’t play other artists that follow her lead. So, in my prediction, not much will change because of this single."

    You may, or may not agree with that verdict - but I think it contains more than a grain of truth.
    I think the bro country singers were trendsetters, but slowly becoming outliers. The music is lacking lyrical quality and are beginning to sound the same. Not too long ago, you could tell who was singing at country radio. Today, I have a hard time telling a lot of them apart. Not too long ago, Reba, Martina, Leeann Rimes, Leann Womack, George Strait, Alan Jackson, and even Shania Twain were being played and heard on country radio and believe me, you could tell them apart. It's not that way today. So Carrie is a trendsetter but is not convincing programmers to change what they're doing. It's the other way around. Jmo
    oldyfan, lizcarlo and bluetb4 like this.

  • #15
    Insane Carrie Fan lizcarlo's Avatar
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    She counteracts Bro Country in very good way quality songs like Something In The Water and with Little Toy Guns when its released. There were couple posting on there and talking about Little Toy Guns :-) I don't mind a couple mindless songs on cds. There is a limit. lol Although id rather not have any at all. There should be more Quality. To be honest I don't think they would be so bad if there was less of Bro Country and more men like Jason Isbell, Lonesome Wyatt, Old Crow Medicine Show, Trampled By Turtles ect. They need to show that country has substance and has different styles of music. Its ridicules when we only have couple women and couple men making quality music. It makes me happy people are appreciating Something In The Water.

  • #16
    Obsessed Carrie Fan carriefan14's Avatar
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    Lol "sausage fest"
    CrazyAboutCarrie likes this.

  • #17
    Carrie Fans Maniac kewlie78189's Avatar
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    Concert Stars
    I am really happy to see a good article about SITW. I have heard so much negativity lately about it because too much about God and this is just a great article to see!

  • #18
    Insane Carrie Fan Carrieroxmysox2011's Avatar
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    Go Carrie.

  • #19
    Insane Carrie Fan lizcarlo's Avatar
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    I had to post couple comments from a fan. Both comments are from same person.

    BRAVO TRIG!!!!!! BRAVO TRIG!!!! Whether you like Carrie Underwood or not, the last time a FEMALE COUNTRY SOLO ARTIST hit the BB PENTOUSE was in May of 2012 – Carrie Underwood for “Blown Away”. You may not like the production on the album, but have any of you heard her LIVE in concert? Totally different from the album and BETTER, although she never misses a note, is not pitchy – just astounding and by the way in concert she doesn’t just sing what’s on the radio. And, story songs – well, Blown Away deals with abuse and alcoholism – very rare these days. Two Black Cadillacs deals with a wife whose husband was cheating on her with his mistress. The two got together and took that cheater down. The video is AMAZING! I could go on and on…
    Do any of you know that she wrote with an elder statesman of the Opry but the demo was LEAKED and she will never release it. She’s said that over and over. To the few who have heard it, it is brilliant. Her circle is tight and whomever leaked that demo – I have no words. And do any of you know that Carrie co-writes strongly. She has the ideas and the words just spill out. Brett James and Chris DeStefano and Carrie wrote Something In The Water at Carrie’s cabin out in the woods and they were jumping around and jumping around (and that’s before they put in the Amazing Grace part). Have any of you bothered to listen to the co-writers of her songs? They are speaking out and they say what a STRONG songwriter she is. Josh Kear & Chris Thompkins talk strongly about Carrie as a songwriter. Regarding Blown Away (and Josh & Chris Thompkins wrote it & as soon as the lyrics were “…There’s not enough rain in Oklahoma…”, they knew it was for Carrie & hoped she would record it – which she did). These two boys also wrote Before He Cheats and were ridiculously excited when Carrie cut it. For both of these songs, Josh & Chris won Grammy’s for Best Country Song. Carrie won Grammy’s for Best Country Solo Performance for both Before He Cheats and Blown Away.
    Multiple songwriting awards, 6 Grammy’s and on and on.. I think maybe some of you who can’t stand Carrie should do some research from non-radio songs and her songwriting. Ever listened to Forever Changed which goes through a young woman to an elderly woman who sadly has Alzhimers. Or Wine After Whiskey which is brilliant as well. Ever listened to the co-writers (of which she wrote many) about their take on Carrie’s songwriting?
    Before you write her off, do your research. And, she has spoken out multiple times regarding the lack of WOMEN in country radio and not just those who are on the charts. I DJ tweeted in response to a fan asking to get SITW to #1 – paraphrasing…it’s Carrie Underwood, no problem, she’s a shoe in…” Oh, how wrong he was because multiple times she has to wait in line before her lablemates are pushed to both MB & BB on Something In The Water. This is the second time it has bit her in the butt. And, oh MB, not BB where she didn’t get #2 (not even close).
    And, did you know that Carrie is solely responsible for the treatments of multiple videos. Check out the producer of Something Bad and see what she says.
    Many of you can say she’s “a made package from American Idol”. So far from the truth…again, do your research on how hard this woman has worked and she FOUGHT for her First Album because she’s wanted country genre – that’s her HEART. Clive pushed so hard for pop – well, he only got half, so they had 2 producers, 1 pop and 1 country. And low and behold, Jesus Take The Wheel went No. 1 almost a year on the Country Airplay Charts & oh, by the way, went 7xPlatinum. And she didn’t stop from there, 3xPlatinum, 2xPlatinum, 1+Platinum & her Greatest Hits: Decade #1 has already been certified Gold.
    Carrie does SO MUCH CHARITY WORK and for the most part is kept anonymous. I have met her and she is the kindest, sweetest, patient, humble, awkward (by her own admission), shy (until she hits the stage) person you will ever meet. She’s Dolly in the making. She’s sang with Dolly once and sang by herself at All For The Hall in Nashville (both times I Will Always Love You) & she sang a surprise duet w/Jennifer Nettles of Nine to Five at the Opry. Dolly is her IDOL and she’s said it many times. Check out what Michael W. Smith said about Carrie for their “All Is Well” in December and very pregnant Carrie at the CMA Country Christmas (by the way, first time Carrie has appeared because she didn’t have a Christmas album out and didn’t feel it was right, however Michael W. Smith did when they sang at that event)..
    I’m not going to apologize for this extremely long post because some of you, in my humble opinion, need to research this AMAZING WOMAN and her husband, MIKE FISHER, as well.
    I hope some of you will do some research – she’s done tributes – Loretta, Little Jimmy (with Vince) at his funeral, Tribute to Linda Ronstadt along with Emmylou, Sheryl Crow, Bonnie Raitt, Stevie Nicks for Linda’s induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Carrie started it off with Different Drum and was in ALL songs. Bono asked her personally to be a part of his Global Citizen Festival in a continuing effort to eridacate AIDS – and she played with The Edge since Bono was injured but was emailing and calling constantly. And she is a wonderful supporter of our US Military (tours, bases, Salute to the Military on The Mall in Washington, D.C.) I could go on and on, but I’ll stop.
    I hope everyone here and Trig have a wonderful day and we are all blessed.



    I get it…your favorite is Lee Ann Womack. I adore Lee Ann and I love her music. Just so you know (but probably don’t care) I am not a kid. I grew up on country music way before Lee Ann, the elders of country music. Country music has changed since before my Dad was born in 1936, however my Dad (who passed 1 year and 2 1/2 months ago) and I listened and watched many of those artists who have long been gone. We sang together to all of those songs, men and women alike. Country music has evolved and changed since the beginning – traditional, R&B, rock, pop, etc. The ONE thing that IS country music is the STORY. Go way back and what is now called traditional, R&B, pop, red dirt, western swing, etc. is not “traditional country music” now. Those artists who have passed were treated poorly because it wasn’t “traditional country music” and they are now LEGENDS of country music. Country music evolves – always has and always will.
    Bro-country is horrible and I can’t stand any of it. But it is what is happening at the moment and hopefully, will go away. However, it won’t be overnight. Bro-country doesn’t tell a story unless you call a story demeaning women.
    If Carrie Underwood went out on a tour with Nelly, Katy Perry, etc. the “traditionalists” would go crazy. Kacey was praised for touring with Katy Perry. I absolutely LOVE Kacey and do not like Katy Perry’s music. But there you go – it happens in the evolution of country music.
    LOVE LEE ANN but don’t hate CARRIE UNDERWOOD. (If you want to strongly dislike bro-country, go ahead and do so, but NEVER hate on any country music artist and I strongly dislike bro-country).
    Have a wonderful day!


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